Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Citizens' Academy to Educate About Local Government

Northampton County will hold its second annual "Citizens' Academy", a free program which aims to better inform participating residents about the workings of county government, beginning on September 4. The program, which filled up quickly last year, has been expanded to an 11-week program and will conclude on November 14.

The informative academy sessions will be held at various locations on Wednesday evenings from 6:30  to 8:30 p.m., except for one session starting at 6 p.m. at the Louise Moore Park on September 11, and the final session, "graduation", which will be held at the Northampton County Council meeting on Thursday, November 14.

Session topics include the following:

  • County Branches of Government
  • Home Rule Charter
  • Elections
  • Courtof Common Pleas
  • District Attorney’s Office
  • Sheriff ‘s Office
  • Human Resources
  • Human Services
  • Emergency Management Services with a tour of the county's 911 Center
  • Gracedale Nursing Home with a tour of the facility
  • Public Works, Parks & Recreation, Bridges, & Open Space - session at Louise Moore Park
  • a tour of the Juvenile Justice Center
  • Department of Corrections with a tour of the County Jail
  • Community & Economic Development
  • Recycling
  • Authorities, Boards and Commissions

Graduates of the Academy will be asked to sign a commitment statement indicating their willingness to serve as a volunteer at one of the county's programs or facilities, or on one of its many authorities, boards, and commissions.

"Last year’s Citizens' Academy was a huge success, with 22 graduates offering  glowing reviews," said Northampton County Director of Administration Tom Harp in a media release about the classes.
"Graduates of Northampton County’s 2012 Citizens’ Academy gave it an overall rating of 5+ out of 5."

"This was a fantastic program, and I enjoyed learning how our local government works – great job pulling it all together," wrote one of last year's participants as feedback.


"This has been a wonderful, educational experience," and "Beyond my expectations," two others reportedly wrote.

There is no charge to participate, but participants must be residents of Northampton County. The only other prerequisites are a commitment to attend all sessions, a willingness to learn, and a genuine interest in county government.

The deadline for registration is August 16, and enrollment is limited to no more than 25 people.

"Already, 10 individuals who were on the waiting list for the 2012 Citizens’ Academy have registered, so space is even more limited," Harp said.

Interested citizens are encouraged to enroll as soon as possible by completing the registration form that can be downloaded in pdf format from the county’s website here.

Completed applications should be mailed to:

Department of Administration
County of Northampton
669 Washington St.
Easton, Pa. 18042
Attention: Tom Harp.


Or, fax the completed registration form to 610-559-3722

For more information, contact Tom Harp, Director of Administration at 610-559-3192 or via email at tharp@northamptoncounty.org

Scene in Easton: Chauncey Howell Sings Schubert

By Christina Georgiou



Easton is home to many colorful and creative individuals, and some familiar faces seen around the city are actually quite famous well beyond the local area.

One such person is longtime TV news reporter Chauncey Howell, who is a familiar face to millions  of viewers in the New York City tri-state area. With a career spanning four decades, first on NBC news and more recently on cable channel News 12, Howell's reporting continues to be broadcast regularly.

The Easton Eccentric caught him just after returning from Brooklyn on Tuesday evening, where he had spent the day producing a short segment for News 12 on the history of Senator Street in the Bay Ridge historic district, which also included some interesting commentary on the interesting facial hair of men in the 19th century.

Despite a long day, after a quick bite to eat at Pearly Baker's, Howell, who enjoys classical music in his spare time, was moved to sing, in German, a bit of Franz Schubert's "Die Forelle" ("The Trout") in front of the restaurant.

Monday, July 29, 2013

Easton Restaurant Week Highlights Local Eateries' Cuisine

Easton is fast becoming known for its plethora of fine eateries, and 18 of those dining establishments will be offering up specials this week as part of Easton Restaurant Week, through Saturday, August 3.
 
The event, which happens twice each year in winter and summer, aims to entice diners to sample the best of what local bistros have to offer. And, just like Easton, the offerings are diverse, from Brazilian to French to Asian to fusion Americana.
 
Each eatery offers up a prix fixe menu for lunch, dinner, or both, of a number of its specialties.
 
Participating are:
  • Black and Blue
  • Dubs on 5th
  • Maxim's 22
  • Sette Luna
  • Leaf Cigar Bar and Lounge
  • Marblehead Chowder House
  • Mesa Modern Mexican
  • Megs and Mads Casual Dining
  • Sogo Fusion Lounge
  • Ocean
  • The Pomfret Club
  • Porters Pub
  • River Grille
  • Valenca
  • Vintage Restaurant & Bar
  • Rivals Sports Bar & Nightclub
  • Batuque Brazilian Restaurant
  • Frozenlandia

Prices vary, but the one-price-for-everything-except-drinks offers a great opportunity to try a new establishment or enjoy specials at a favorite one for a discount.

Bon appetit!

This Week in Easton, July 29 to August 1

Ah, the lazy dog days of summer...


Monday, July 29

Easton Veggie Van Stop: 5:30 p.m. Volunteers will distribute in-season vegetables and produce grown at local community gardens. Free, donations appreciated. South 10th and Pine streets, near the community garden. Click here for more information.

Palmer Township Shade Tree Commission meeting: 6:30 p.m. In the Palmer Library meeting room, at the Municipal Complex, 1 Weller Place (off of Newburg Road), Palmer Township.



Comedy Show: 8 p.m. With Rodney Laney, Dan Shelly, Kris Fried, Nate Marshall, and Jesse Keim. Free. Rivals, 5 Lehn's Court. 610-392-2932 or www.rivalseaston.com


 

Tuesday, July 30


Duplicate Bridge: 11:30 a.m. Temple Covenant of Peace, 1451 Northampton St.

Line Dancing: 7 to 9:30 p.m. Beginner lessons 7:15 p.m. Open dancing follows. $5 per person. Tatamy Fire Company, 164 Bushkill St., Tatamy. 610-759-2786 or www.purecountrydancers.com


Wednesday, July 31


Craft Workshop: 1 to 2:30 p.m. Make a robot sculpture out of recycled materials and learn about robots and artificial life. $7 per child. Registration required. Nurture Nature Center, 518 Northampton St. 610-253-4432 or www.nurturenaturecenter.org

Weyerbacher Wednesday: 4 to 9 p.m. The Easton Farmers' Market's new weekday evening market. Twenty producer-only vendors offer fresh locally grown produce, herb, flowers, raw milk, cheese and yogurt, pasture-raised meat and eggs, artisan breads and baked goods, prepared foods, and vegan specialties. www.eastonfarmersmarket.org or click here for more information.\

Easton Area Homebrewers meeting: 7 p.m. Black & Blue, 683 Walnut St. 610-438-3604 or www.blackandblueeaston.com

Texas Hold'em: 7 & 9 p.m. Free. La Pazza, 1251 Ferry St. 610-515-0888 or www.lapazza.com

Brosky & Meyers: 7 p.m. The Widow's Tavern, 200 Main St., Stockertown. 610-365-8890 or www.widowstavern.com

Hall & Oates Tribute by The Family Men: 8 p.m. Black & Blue, 683 Walnut St. 610-438-3604 or www.blackandblueeaston.com

Jam Session: 8 p.m. Hosted by Lou Franco. Rivals, 5 Lehn's Court. 610-392-2932 or www.rivalseaston.com

Open Mic with Scott Harrington: 9:30 p.m. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com


Thursday, August 1


Williams Township Landfill Advisory Committee meeting: 8 a.m. Williams Township Municipal Complex, 655 Cider Press Road, Williams Township.

Fundraiser Happy Hour: 4 to 7 p.m. Ten percent of all sales will go to the Easton Firefighters Coats for Kids campaign, sponsored by IAFF Local 713. Plus, tours of the Easton fire station across the street from 5:30 to 7 p.m., 50/50 raffles, and t-shirts for sale. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com For more about the Coats for Kids campaign or to donate directly, visit is.gd/EastonCoats

Forks Township Board of Supervisors work session: 7 p.m. Forks Township Municipal Complex, 1606 Sullivan Trail, Forks Township.

Karaoke with Off the Grid Entertainment: 8 p.m. Rivals, 5 Lehn's Court. 610-392-2932 or www.rivalseaston.com

Karaoke: 8 p.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Mike Pilgermayer: 9 p.m. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com

Open Mic with Nick Levinos: 9:30 p.m. Pearly Bakers, 11 Centre Square. 610-253-9949 or www.pearlybakers.net

"This Week in Easton" lists what's happening during the weekdays, from special events to who's playing to government meetings, all in one handy place. Not just in the City of Easton, but for the entire greater Easton area...Published every Monday morning!

Is there a community or entertainment event you'd like to see here? Are you organizing something you'd like to have posted? Did we miss something? Email us!

Last updated on Wednesday, July 31 at 11:03 a.m.

Friday, July 26, 2013

Weekend Guide, July 26 to 28

The cooler temperatures mean there's no excuse not to have a hot time in Easton this weekend...


Friday, July 26


Line Dancing: 7 to 10:30 p.m. Lessons at 7:15 p.m. $5 per person for members, $6 for non-members. Tatamy Fire Company, 164 Bushkill St., Tatamy. 610-759-2786 or www.purecountrydancers.com

Connie & Tommy's Open Mike: 7 to 10 p.m. Bella Luna, 3417 Sullivan Trail, Forks Township. 610-253-7458

Live in the Square - Hot Bijouxx: 7:30 p.m. Free, sponsored by the Easton Main Street Initiative. Centre Square.

Smooveedge, Christmas in July: Band at 7:30 p.m., Christmas in July party at 10:30 p.m.  Rivals Sports Bar & Nightclub, 5 Lehns Court. 610-923-7625 or www.rivalseaston.com

The Damn Dirty Apes, Stingy Jack, Governing Murphy, Sgt. Bacita, & Vegafuse: 8 p.m. Mother's Bar and Grille, 3 Lehn's Court (just off Centre Square), 610-253-1012

Sal Ritz & Joe Mixon: 8 p.m. The Riegelsville Inn, 12 Delaware Road, Riegelsville. 610-749-0100 or www.riegelsvilleinn.com

Dan DeChellis Trio: 8 p.m. Connexions Gallery, 213 Northampton St. 610-250-7627


Patrick Poladian: 9 p.m. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com

Trevor Purdy & Scott Young: 9 p.m. Colonial Pizza & Spaghetti House, 136-138 Spring Garden St. 610-252-3033 or www.colonialpizzapub.com

DJ Mikey Z: 10 p.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Maria Woodford & Co.: 10 p.m. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

DJ Dub Shepard: 10 p.m. Pearly Baker's Alehouse, 11 Centre Square. 610-253-9949 or www.pearlybakers.net


Saturday, July 27



Easton Farmers' Market "Zucchini 500": 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participants build their own race vehicles from zucchini and then compete to see who has engineered the speediest squash on wheels. Centre Square.  Click here for more details.

DJ event: Noon to 2 p.m., DJ Rabeka spins dancehall and drum 'n bass, 2 to 4 p.m., DJ Mumbler spins drum 'n bass. Used Grooves, 401 Northampton St. 610-252-8282 or www.usedgrooves.com

Easton Hispanic Cultural Festival: Noon to 9:30 p.m. Live music and entertainment, food, and much more is planned for this special event. Fireworks over the river beginning at 9 p.m. too! Scott Park, Larry Holmes Drive, just south of the free bridge. Click here for more details.

Mitch from 99 The Hawk, DJ LAX: Mitch at 7:30 p.m., DJ at 10:30 p.m.  Rivals Sports Bar & Nightclub, 5 Lehns Court. 610-923-7625 or www.rivalseaston.com

Free Texas Hold'em: 7 & 9 p.m. La Pazza, 1251 Ferry St. 610-515-0888 or www.lapazza.com

Saturday Night Dance: 8 to 11 p.m. With music by King Henry and the Showmen. $10 per person. Charles Chrin Community Center, 4100 Green Pond Road, Palmer Township. 610-252-2098

Laurie Vosburg and 519 South: 8 p.m. The Riegelsville Inn, 12 Delaware Road, Riegelsville. 610-749-0100 or www.riegelsvilleinn.com

Amos: 8 p.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Forks Township Movies in the Park: "Madagascar 3, Europe's Most Wanted", movie begins at dusk. Bring a lawn chair or blanket for a more comfortable viewing experience. Forks Township Community Park Amphitheatre, 500 Zucksburg Road, Forks Township. Click here for more details and other Forks community events.

The Roux: 9 p.m. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com

Connie Edinger: : 9 p.m. The Widow's Tavern, 200 Main St., Stockertown. 610-365-8890 or www.widowstavern.com

Karaoke with Nort: 9 p.m. Rip Van Winkle's Pub, 3700 Nicholas St., Palmer Township. 610-258-8873

Mariko Marimoto: 10 p.m. Singer-songwriter from NYC, with Alex Musso of the Hoochie Coochie Men. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

Only Living Boy: 10 p.m. Pearly Baker's Alehouse, 11 Centre Square. 610-253-9949 or www.pearlybakers.net

"Dance-a-Palooza": 10 p.m. With a DJ. Mesa Modern Mexican, 42 South Third St. 610-829-2101 or www.mesamexican.com


Sunday, July 28


Open Mic Hosted by Jim Stocker: 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Industry Night: 10 p.m.  Rivals Sports Bar & Nightclub, 5 Lehns Court. 610-923-7625 or www.rivalseaston.com


Save the Date!


The Easton City auction, which was cancelled at the last minute in April, has been rescheduled for Saturday, August 10 at the city public works complex at 500 Bushkill St. View items beginning  at 8 a.m., auction begins at 9 a.m. A number of interesting city items, including West Ward Street signs, city Christmas decorations and more is expected to be on the list of items to be auctioned. Click here for more details, and check back, as we'll publish a more detailed list of items when it becomes available.

Easton's most comprehensive guide to what's happening over the weekend, in the city and beyond, is published every Friday.

Are you planning an event? Did we miss something? Let us know! Email us.

Sponsoring the Weekend Guide is an excellent way to advertise your local business. Plus, you get a permanent link to your website, also a great way to drive more traffic to your door. It's affordable too. Email us for details.

Updated at 7:57 p.m.

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Man Shot in City, Easton Police Looking for Two Suspects

A 21-year-old man was shot in the early hours of Thursday morning, and Easton police are looking for two suspects.

Police say they were dispatched to South Seventh and Ferry streets just before 4:30 a.m. for a report of shots fired. Shortly thereafter, they received a report of a gunshot victim a block away, in the first block of South Eighth Street.

The victim, who police have not identified, was shot multiple times and was transported to an undisclosed hospital for treatment. He is expected to survive, police said.

Evidence of the shooting was found in the intersection of South Seventh and Ferry streets, police say.

Authorities are looking for two suspects in the case:

The first suspect is described as a Hispanic male, about five-foot-seven to five-foot-eight-inches tall, weighing 130 to 140 pounds, and wearing a black hoodie with the hood down.  He was also described as having a New York accent. After the shooting, the suspect reportedly fled the scene east on Ferry Street.

The second suspect is described as a black male, five-foot-nine to five-foot-ten-inches tall. He was  wearing a grey hoodie with the hood up.  He was described as also having a New York accent and fled the scene north on Seventh Street.

Police said they believe there was some sort of dispute prior to the shooting.

Anyone with any information is asked to call Easton detectives at 610-759-2200, 610-250-6667 or the Easton Police investigative tip line at 610-250-6635.  Callers can remain anonymous. 

Scene in Easton: The Mayor's Summer Youth Academy

By Christina Georgiou

From left to right, local high school students Asia Morton, Sam Boric,
Michael Weiss, and Daniel Ramut address Easton City Council members
Wednesday evening.
Four ambitious high school student have been attending the "Mayor's Summer Youth Academy" this week, a four-day camp experience in Easton with Mayor Sal Panto that provides teens with  hands-on education about how municipal government works.

Asia Morton, of Palmer Township who will complete her senior year Easton Area High School, Sam Boric and Michael Weiss, both from Nazareth and incoming freshmen at Nazareth Area High School, and Daniel Ramut, who will be attending EAHS as an incoming freshman, all spent the last few days  with the mayor learning about Easton and how the city's government operates.

The group also took a tour of the Downtown district and visited the city's waste water treatment plant--which, "Once you get over the awful smell is actually pretty cool," said one attendee.

The group will also view exhibits at the Sigal museum today, the final day of the camp experience.

The four teens attending the Mayor's Summer Youth
Academy chat with Mayor Sal Panto after dinner
at the Easton Farmers' Market Wednesday evening.
 Wednesday evening, after dining at the Easton Farmers' Market and having an ice cream dessert at the Bank Street Creamery, each gave a short presentation to city council on their views of current  local issues, including opposing a curfew for underage residents, a perceived need for a non-ethnic grocery store in the city, allowing the keeping chickens on residential properties with restrictions, and how to better utilize Hugh Moore Park for special city events.

Council members praised the four as future leaders Wednesday evening after their presentations and encouraged them to keep up "the great work that you're doing."

Panto said the week has been fun and educational, adding that their parents, many of who attended the council meeting Wednesday evening, should be proud of the teens.

"Hopefully, they did learn about civic engagement," he said. "I commend the parents, and, younger siblings, this is something you should strive for."

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Easton City Council Selects Jim Edinger to Fill Vacant Seat

By Christina Georgiou

Jim Edinger, seen sitting in the back row of the Easton
City Council meeting Wednesday evening.

Easton city council selected Jim Edinger at it's regular meeting Wednesday evening to fill the West Ward council seat left vacant by the resignation of councilman Mike Fleck earlier this month.

Edinger, who has served on the city's zoning hearing board for the past 19 years, is also the Democratic candidate for the West Ward council representative in the coming November election.

He faces Republican candidate Kim Yedloskey in November, and the winner of the election will then represent the West Ward beginning in 2014.

Edinger was chosen over fellow applicant Stephen White, a former West Ward Neighborhood Partnership steering committee member.

Edinger's appointment is a reversal of council's traditional opposition to selecting an active candidate, but city council members said his long service to the city made him the best choice to fill the slot, though all said they believed both applicants were excellent.

"We had two quality candidates in front of us that gave us great feedback," said Councilman Jeff Warren, who nominated Edinger. "I do feel Edinger's long service to the city will be an asset."

"This will be a difficult decision for me because I've sat with both of them on different boards," said Councilwoman Sandra Vulcano, who moved to close the nominations after Warren put forth Edinger as his choice. "They're both very dedicated to the community, but Mr. Edinger has been here longer."

"Both of the candidates were very eloquent and showed dedication to the city," said Councilman Roger Ruggles. "The problem is, you have to choose one. I think that either of the candidates would have been a valuable addition to the council."

Panto praised Edinger's long experience.

"I think Jim brings a wealth of experience and knowledge," the mayor said.

After the vote, Edinger was brief in his comments.

"I just want to thank you for your support, and I'm looking forward to serving with you all," he said.

Edinger will be sworn in privately later this week, Panto said, so he can immediately begin to work with council members, but he will publicly take the oath of office at the next city council meeting on Wednesday, August 8 as well.

He will also be meeting with the city administration this week as well, to better familiarize himself with their operations, he said. Edinger will take over the city council's administration committee, which Fleck formerly headed.

Edinger said he doesn't have any specific agenda coming into his new position with the city, which runs until the end of the year.

Edinger's appointment means his immediate resignation from his position as chairman of the city's zoning hearing board.

Panto said the vacant seat on that board will not be a problem to fill, as Easton has several applicants to the board on a waiting list, and he expects one of them will be immediately appointed at the board's next meeting.

White was not present at Wednesday evening's city council meeting.

Mike Fleck officially resigned at the July 10 city council meeting due to a move to Allentown and to concentrate on his political consulting business. Fleck had originally announced he would serve until the end of the year, but found a house in the Lehigh County city earlier than expected, he told the council in June.

Vacant Easton City Council Seat Expected to Be Filled Tonight

By Christina Georgiou

After interviewing two applicants Tuesday evening to fill the vacancy left by Mike Fleck's resignation earlier this month, Easton City Council is expected to vote on the matter tonight and appoint one of the two to occupy the position until the end of the year.

Stephen White, owner of Delaware
River Books and a former WWNP
steering committee member, answers
questions Tuesday evening posed
by Easton City Council members.
 Former West Ward Neighborhood Partnership steering committee member and Delaware River Books owner Stephen White, and Jim Edinger, who is the Democratic candidate for the seat in November's election and chair for the city's zoning hearing board, each fielded questions from council members, mostly pertaining to West Ward neighborhood issues and their ideas on how the city can be improved.

Both live in the district--White for the past eight years, and Edinger for 28 years--a requirement to fill the vacancy. The empty city council seat is one of four neighborhood-specific posts on the city's governing body.

Despite that only one of them will be appointed, the two were incredibly friendly during the process.

"I don't feel like I'm in competition with you," White said to Edinger after the interviews, adding that he doesn't want to be a politician. "(If appointed) I'm a stop gap."

Jim Edinger
File photo
 Edinger said that despite city council saying it doesn't traditionally appoint active candidates to open seats, since he wants the post permanently, it was worth throwing his name into the ring.

There is no law that says a candidate can't be appointed, said Mayor Sal Panto after the meeting, adding that council members have not had a chance to discuss the attributes of the two applicants, and he doesn't know which of the two men council will choose Wednesday evening.

White said he's happy either way it goes, adding that he's likely to vote for Edinger in the general election.

The only one who seemed unhappy with the situation was Republican city council candidate Kim Yedlosky, who asked city council if she could be considered too.

Yedlosky said she would have applied for the seat, only she thought Fleck's replacement needed to be a Democrat, based on a media article she'd read.

Mayor Sal Panto confirmed that the appointee could be from any political affiliation, but said that since the July 3 deadline had passed, city officials wouldn't consider Yedlosky at this point.

Rules Regulating Ice Cream Trucks Don't Need to Be Changed, Council Says

By Christina Georgiou

To many Easton children, the sound of an ice cream truck coming is music to their young ears, but to some local adults, the constant jingles they play jangle their nerves.

Some citizens have recently complained about ice cream trucks' music being too loud and playing the same tunes repetitively, city council said Tuesday evening at its committee meeting. The city has sent out letters to the four licensed ice cream truck owners reminding them of city ordinances pertaining to their businesses, but there still may be a problem, members said.

Harold Figueroa, owner of Jerry's Ice Cream and
one of four city ice cream truck operators,
talks about his business practices at the
Easton City Council committee meeting
Tuesday evening. The city says it has
been fielding a number of complaints in
recent weeks about ice cream trucks playing
music too loudly and playing the same tunes
over and over again, annoying residents.
Harold Figueroa, owner of Jerry's Ice Cream, who was the only truck operator to attend the meeting, said he follows city ordinances faithfully, and if there is a problem, it's another mobile ice cream vendor, not him.

"Since 1996, I've only received three complaints," Figueroa said. "All you've got to tell me is, 'turn down the music.'"

Figueroa said that ice cream trucks need to play their jingles to alert potential customers, who are mostly children, that they're nearby. The tunes need to be loud enough for people to hear through closed windows and over running air conditioners too, he said.

He noted that he often donates half of his profits to local school and charitable events he's asked to bring his truck to, and even sometimes gives children on his routes credit or free ice cream when they don't have the money to buy a cone.

"Am I getting rich? No. I'm behind on my mortgage," Figueroa said, adding that because he has children he has trouble saying 'no'.

Figueroa said that when he stops, he usually turns the music down.

"You said that you turn it down, but do you ever turn it off?" Councilman Jeff Warren asked, saying that some of the complaints too indicated that some residents are annoyed by ice cream trucks that play the same tune over and over.

Figueroa said that he doesn't usually turn it off entirely, but he will if people ask him to. And, if the city council requires it in the future, he will.

"Tell me what you want me to do," he told city council members.

Figueroa said too that he changes his music from time to time, and will play other tunes when children request it.

"I've got 36 tunes on my box," he said.

"I want to know who's complaining," he added, saying that it's likely the complaints are about another ice cream vendor in the city. "We don't even come Downtown or go near the ice cream shops or the farmers' market. Everyone needs to make a living. We have routes where people stay and wait for us."

Council members and Mayor Sal Panto said they didn't want Jerry's Ice Cream to take the inquiry and discussion personally, especially since he was the only vendor present.

Breezy's, whose owner did not attend the city council
committee meeting discussing ice cream truck practices,
was seen cruising Downtown right after the meeting
Tuesday evening. It too plays short jingles via a
loudspeaker to attract potential customers.
 "It's not that we're targeting you. We got complaints and when we receive complaints, we look into it," Warren said. "It might be another company that's not respecting (city ordinances)."

City officials said Tuesday evening that more ordinances aren't needed to deal with the issue, instead agreeing to send another letter to all the city ice cream truck vendors reminding them of the rules.

If that isn't effective in quenching citizen complaints, the city will deal with the issue on a case-by-case basis, officials said.

Melody Rogers, who heads the South Side Civic Association, said Jerry's Ice Cream is a benefit to the neighborhood.

"I've seen so many times a kid goes up to him and says, 'Jerry, can I have an ice cream? Here's a dime,'" she said. "I'll tell you what, he's so dedicated to these kids."

Declaration Reader to Portray John Adams


Christopher Black, as Robert Levers reading
the Declaration of Independence on
Centre Square earlier this month
at Easton Heritage Day.
 Christopher Black, Easton resident and this year's reader of the Declaration of Independence at Easton Heritage Day, will portray John Adams in September at the Bachmann Publick House.

Billed as a dinner theatre event, "An Evening with John Adams" begins at 6 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 20.

Black will portray the founding father as he was in 1777, according to an announcement about the event. Enroute to York, where Continental Congress members were to meet, Adams stopped briefly in Easton and is said to have stayed at the Bachmann.

At the time, the Bachmann Publick House was a thriving business. Pubs were not only often hotels and places to get refreshment, but were common meeting places to exchange news of the day in the 18th century.

Black, who moved to Easton about eight years ago from New York City, is a former member of the now-defunct  off-Broadway Jean Cocteau Repertory Theatre.

Tickets are $50 apiece, and seating is limited. To attend, RSVPs must be received by Saturday, Sept. 7.

Call 610-253-1222 for reservations or more information.

Upcoming Art Show to Reimagine Social Movements

Artists have often been moved to take part in social movements and had strong opinions about various causes, and that will be the topic of the Arts Community of Easton's upcoming show at the Quadrant Gallery C, opening on Saturday, August 3, with a reception from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Entitled "Reanimated Movements", the show will include the topics of civil rights, American poverty, women’s suffrage, conscientious objection, laborer’s rights, Roe vs. Wade, and more, says a media release on the exhibit.

Ryan Scacci, of The Philosopher’s Stone in Belvidere, NJ will debut "Artist as Martyr", intended to be a commentary on the role of artists in society. A number of other Lehigh Valley artists reimagining and reanimating causes they feel strongly about will also be featured as well.

"Many of the pieces will feature compelling commentary for the public, making this a show of culture and education," said show curator Marlana Eck in an announcement of the show.

Two live poetry events will accompany the art exhibit.

Event organizer and poet Matt Wolf, along with other local poets, will perform activist-inspired poetry at the opening day reception, and again on Saturday, August 24.

The poetry readings complement the show's theme, Eck noted.

"Over the years, artists have been the backbone to social movements around the world. Whether it was a photograph of someone picketing, a portrait of a martyr for the cause, or a poster for a rally, art created a sense of urgency for change," she said in the press release.

Quadrant Gallery C is located on the second floor of the Quadrant Bookmart and Coffee House, at 20 North Third St. The show is scheduled to run through Saturday, Sept. 7.

The exhibit is still accepting pieces from local artists until August 1 too. Open to works in all mediums, the only stipulation is that those submitted must be inspired by a social movement that the artist  strongly identifies with from any period in history. 

For more information about the show or how to submit art for this exhibition, visit www.eastonart.org or email show curator Marlana Eck.

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Home and Planet's Successor Opens in Downtown Easton

By Christina Georgiou

RE:find, featuring decorative furnishings "found + fresh", opened Saturday
on Northampton Street in Downtown Easton.
 RE:find, a shop specializing in decorative furnishings "found + fresh", celebrated its grand opening this past Saturday on Northampton Street in Downtown Easton with a daylong event that featured food goodies from a number of local upscale eateries, including Black and Blue and icecream from the Bank Street Creamery.

The store and art gallery, is to replace the popular Home and Planet located in Bethlehem, which is set to close in the face of the building being sold.

Owners Ron Susser and Jon Clark, who are partners in life as well as business, won't have to worry about relocating again though, as Susser owns the new location at 437 Northampton St.

Wine racks made from old terra cotta
drainpipes are one example of the shop's
goods made from reclaimed and repurposed
materials.
 The two also moved to Easton about a month ago too, Clark said.

"The vibe here is great," he said, noting that he decided to open the new store in Easton instead of searching for a new location in Bethlehem because there is more new residential construction happening here, and those moving in will be ideal customers.

"What made me think of Easton is everything going on...especially all the apartments across the street," Clark said.

RE:find is similar to Home and Planet, which is "winding down", and features upscale furnishings, decorative items, all constructed from recycled and sustainable materials, with the makers being located all over the globe.

The new shop is clearly ready to go, but more items and artisans will be added in coming months, Clark said.

"We have about 65 artists now," he said. "But this is the beginning of the buying season."

He estimated the shop will ultimately carry goods from about 100 artisans and fine crafters, and he said he plans to bring back a number of new items from upcoming shows in the next month or two as well.

RE:find's downstairs art gallery will regularly feature new
shows from artists, both local and not, said owner Jon Clark.

The downstairs art gallery will showcase new artists and works on a regular basis, Clark said. The current exhibit is "Icons Revised" by New York City artist Pablo Molgora.

That Easton is the perfect place for the new store and gallery, not to mention the couple's new home, Clark is certain.

"We love it," Clark said.
RE:find is open on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., and on Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.

For more about RE:find, visit the store's website at www.refindeaston.com

Downtown Boutique Searching for Models

Elite Boutique, located at 21 South Second St. in Downtown Easton, is
looking for models for an upcoming fashion show.
Contributed photo
The newly opened Elite Boutique on South Second Street in Downtown Easton is looking for models for an upcoming fashion show.

Those interested in taking part are encouraged to contact the shop, which is accepting photos by email and also scheduling appointments to meet applicants in person.

The date and location of the show have not yet been finalized, but the event is expected to take place at the end of August.

"Please contact us if you think you have what it takes, are at least 21 years of age, (are) outgoing, and think you can represent us in an 'Elite' way," said boutique owner Nicole Foster in an announcement about the event.

Photos can be emailed to eliteboutique1205@gmail.com or for more information or to set up an appointment, modeling hopefuls can call 484-522-9421.

More about the shop can be found on its website at www.eliteboutique1.com.

Monday, July 22, 2013

Forum to Address Backyard Chicken Questions

A public discussion forum to talk about the pros and cons of keeping backyard chickens in urban areas will be held on Thursday, August 8 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Nurture Nature Center, 518 Nothampton St.

"Chicken Dialogues" will include a special presentation and ensuing discussion about raising backyard chickens in urban areas, an announcement about the event says.

The forum is in response to a College Hill resident's request to Easton City Council in early May that the city reconsider its ban on the keeping of chickens within city limits.

Resident Annie Porter requested that city ordinances be changed to allow residents to be able to keep up to six hens, but not roosters, at their properties to provide accessible, affordable fresh eggs.

After Porter's request, Easton Mayor Sal Panto and city council members promised to consider the matter and take public input.

City council banned the keeping of all small livestock in 2009, after numerous complaints from a College Hill resident about their neighbors' three chickens, one of which was a rooster.
For more information about the "Chicken Dialogues" discussion, call 610-253-4432 or visit www.nurturenaturecenter.org

This Week in Easton, July 22 to 25

So, you survived the heat...Enjoy what looks to be a great week!


Monday, July 22


Northampton County Gaming Revenue and Economic Redevelopment Authority meeting: 5:30 p.m. Northampton County Courthouse, County Council Meeting Room, Floor 3, 669 Washington St.

Easton Veggie Van Stop: 5:30 p.m. Volunteers will distribute in-season vegetables and produce grown at local community gardens. Free, donations appreciated. South 10th and Pine streets, near the community garden. Click here for more information.

Forks Township Historical Society Pot-luck Picnic: 6 p.m. To be held in the pavilion. Faith Lutheran Church, 2012 Sullivan Trail, Forks Township. 610-253-1035

Wilson Borough Council meeting: 7 p.m. 2040 Hay Terrace, Wilson Borough.

Williams Township Fire Company Annual Carnival: Begins 7 p.m. Fun, food, games, rides, and live music! Proceeds benefit the Williams Township Fire Company. Runs nightly through Saturday, July 27. Williams Township Fire Station  No.1, 2500 Morgan Hill Road, Williams Township. 610-252-7648


Tuesday, July 23


Duplicate Bridge: 11:30 a.m. Temple Covenant of Peace, 1451 Northampton St.

"Pups on the Patio": 5 to 8 p.m. Imbibe in a cool summer brew while lounging outside with your pooch. Representatives from Rogers' Rescues will be on hand. Pearly Baker's Alehouse, Rivals Sports Bar & Nightclub and Mother's Bar & Grill, just off the southeast quadrant of Centre Square. 610-253-9949

Easton City Council committee meeting: 6 p.m. The two candidates to fill the vacant West Ward city council position, Stephen White and Jim Edinger, are expected to be interviewed at this meeting. Council is expected to appoint one of the two at the regular city council meeting on Wednesday.  City Hall, city council chambers, sixth floor, 1 South Third St.

Palmer Township Board of Supervisors meeting: 7 p.m. In the Palmer Library meeting room, at the Municipal Complex, 1 Weller Place (off of Newburg Road), Palmer Township.

Williams Township Fire Company Annual Carnival: Begins 7 p.m. Fun, food, games, rides, and live music! Proceeds benefit the Williams Township Fire Company. Runs nightly through Saturday, July 27. Williams Township Fire Station  No.1, 2500 Morgan Hill Road, Williams Township. 610-252-7648

Movies in the Park - "Monsters Inc": 8:30 p.m. Bring your own blankets and chairs. Weather permitting. Free, sponsored by the Easton Mayor's Office of Special Events. Behind the Easton Area Community Center, 901 Washington St. Click here for the full schedule of movies in the park and live concerts this summer in the City of Easton.
POSTPONED due to the chance of inclement weather


Wednesday, July 24


"Rivers, oceans, and swamps!": 1 to 2:30 p.m. Use old cereal boxes and craft materials to create nature dioramas and learn about rivers, oceans, and swamps! $7 per child. Nurture Nature Center, 518 Northampton St. 610-253-4432 or www.nurturenaturecenter.org

Weyerbacher Wednesday: 4 to 9 p.m. The Easton Farmers' Market's new weekday evening market. Twenty producer-only vendors offer fresh locally grown produce, herb, flowers, raw milk, cheese and yogurt, pasture-raised meat and eggs, artisan breads and baked goods, prepared foods, and vegan specialties. Centre Square. www.eastonfarmersmarket.org or click here for more information.

Birdhouse Demonstration: 4 to 8 p.m. Learn to house your feathered friends with a tin can. Artist Marlana Eck will show you how it's done. In the ACE tent, at the Easton Farmers' Market Weyerbacher Wednesday, Centre Square.
Easton City Council meeting: 6 p.m. City Hall, city council chambers, sixth floor, 1 South Third St.

Sounds of Summer - Desire: 6:30 to 9 p.m. Bring along a lawn chair or blanket for a more comfortable viewing experience of this do wop band. Free, refreshments will be available for purchase. In case of rain, the concert will be held at the same time on Thursday, July 25. Forks Township Community Park Amphitheatre, 500 Zucksberg Road. Click here for a full schedule of concerts and movies in the park in Forks Township this summer.

Easton Area School Board meeting: 7 p.m. Education Center, board room, 1801 Bushkill Drive, Forks Township.

Palmer Township Environmental Steering Committee meeting: 7 p.m. In the Palmer Library meeting room, at the Municipal Complex, 1 Weller Place (off of Newburg Road), Palmer Township.

Williams Township Zoning Hearing Board meeting: 7 p.m. Williams Township Municipal Complex, 655 Cider Press Road, Easton (Williams Township)

Williams Township Fire Company Annual Carnival: Begins 7 p.m. Fun, food, games, rides, and live music! Proceeds benefit the Williams Township Fire Company. Runs nightly through Saturday, July 27. Williams Township Fire Station  No.1, 2500 Morgan Hill Road, Williams Township. 610-252-7648

Texas Hold'em: 7 & 9 p.m. Free. La Pazza, 1251 Ferry St. 610-515-0888 or www.lapazza.com

Frederick Douglas: 7 p.m. The Widow's Tavern, 200 Main St., Stockertown. 610-365-8890 or www.widowstavern.com

Traditional Irish open jam session: 7:30 p.m. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

Jam Session: 8 p.m. Hosted by Lou Franco. Rivals, 5 Lehn's Court. 610-392-2932 or www.rivalseaston.com

Chris Thomas: 8 p.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Thursday, July 25


"Coffee, Tea, & Memories": 1:30 p.m. Dolly Madison will be portrayed by Melissa Yiaski Rabinsky, historian, actress and historical interpreter.  Wilson Borough Community Center, 2200 Liberty St., Wilson Borough. 610-258-3040

"Weyerbacher Served Rare": 7 to 9 p.m. Six Weyerbacher brews on tap: 2012 Imperial Pumpkin, Eighteen, Aquila, Merry Monks, Last Chance IPA, and VERY RARE Sunday Morning Stout. Meet the brewers, grab a pint glass and get a free chance to win a 750ml bottle of Viridis Lupulus! Mary Alouette show follows this event--see below. Black & Blue, 683 Walnut St. 610-438-3604 or www.blackandblueeaston.com

Williams Township Fire Company Annual Carnival: Begins 7 p.m. Fun, food, games, rides, and live music! Proceeds benefit the Williams Township Fire Company. Runs nightly through Saturday, July 27. Williams Township Fire Station  No.1, 2500 Morgan Hill Road, Williams Township. 610-252-7648

Tiffany and the Skyliners: 8 p.m. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

Karaoke with Off the Grid Entertainment: 8 p.m. Rivals, 5 Lehn's Court. 610-392-2932 or www.rivalseaston.com

Karaoke: 8 p.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Mary Alouette: 9 p.m. With Kristen Jas, Dallas Vietty, Matt Cross, Ethan Foote, and Alex Dadras. Black & Blue, 683 Walnut St. 610-438-3604 or www.blackandblueeaston.com or click here for more details about this show.

TBA: 9 p.m. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com

DJ Dub Shepard: 9:30 p.m. Pearly Bakers, 11 Centre Square. 610-253-9949 or www.pearlybakers.net

"This Week in Easton" lists what's happening during the weekdays, from special events to who's playing to government meetings, all in one handy place. Not just in the City of Easton, but for the entire greater Easton area...Published every Monday morning!

Is there a community or entertainment event you'd like to see here? Are you organizing something you'd like to have posted? Did we miss something? Email us!

Last updated on Tuesday, July 23 at 2:34 p.m.

Saturday, July 20, 2013

Easton Man Found Dead in Lehigh River

An Easton man was found dead in the Lehigh River this morning, and authorities are investigating how he died, according to the Northampton County Coroner's office.

The body of Joshua Pereira, 25, was found floating in the water by a fisherman and emergency personnel were dispatched to the scene along Larry Holmes Drive at 7:38 a.m., said Northampton County Chief Deputy Coroner Kelly Gillis.

The man's family has been notified of his death, she said.

At this point, the manner of Pereira's death is unclear, she said, adding that an autopsy is pending and the investigation into the circumstances surrounding the man's passing is ongoing.

"It will be a few weeks before we know all the particulars of how he died," Gillis said.

According to various online sources, Pereira was a West Ward Easton resident who lived on the 800 block of Ferry Street and was the father of two young children.

Updated at 4:39 p.m. to add background information.

Scene in Easton: Production Company Filming Potential Cable Show in City

By Christina Georgiou

A New York video production company visited Downtown Easton Friday afternoon
to shoot footage for a potential new cable television show.
 An unidentified production company from New York was seen filming footage for a potential new history show for a major cable television network on the first block of South Third Street in Downtown Easton late Friday afternoon.

A production assistant with the company declined to give detailed information about the show or who's involved, saying that the group was filming pilot footage to pitch to the network, which has not yet approved its production or agreed to fund it.

"You never know about these things," she said. "We could hear back in two weeks, or it could be four months."

She said the show being pitched is about the "love of American history, the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, that sort of thing." It was hinted that the test footage may be intended for The History Channel.

If the show is approved to be taped for air, the crew will definitely be returning to Easton in the future to shoot more scenes, she said.

Easton Police Looking for Man Who Threatened Crowd with Gun

Easton police are reportedly looking for a man who threatened a group of people with a gun Friday evening.

An arrest warrant has been issued for Emannuel Miranda-Torres, 25, who also goes by the name "Blanco". He is charged with aggravated assault with a firearm, five counts of recklessly endangering another person, making terroristic threats, and conspiracy.

Police say Miranda-Torres, along with another person who was not identified, pointed guns at a group of people around 8:30 p.m. Friday night on the 600 block of Ferry Street.

Miranda-Torres is to be considered armed and dangerous, authorities said, and anyone who sees him or who has information about his whereabouts should call 911.

Friday, July 19, 2013

Weekend Guide, July 19 to 21

After such a hot week, you deserve a cool time. And Easton's the place!


Friday, July 19


Dancing: 7 to 10 p.m. Instruction in the country two-step with Con Callagher from 7 to 8 p.m., open dancing with DJ Carol Coffinger from 8 to 10 p.m. $10 per person, benefits the Third Street Alliance. 41 North Third St. 610-433-7804 or www.thirdstreetalliance.org

Line Dancing: 7 to 10:30 p.m. Lessons at 7:15 p.m. $5 per person for members, $6 for non-members. Tatamy Fire Company, 164 Bushkill St., Tatamy. 610-759-2786 or www.purecountrydancers.com

Line Dancing: 7 to 10:30 p.m. Lessons at 7:15 p.m. $5 per person for members, $6 for non-members. Tatamy Fire Company, 164 Bushkill St., Tatamy. 610-759-2786 or www.purecountrydancers.com

Philadelphia Funk Authority, DJ LAX: Band at 7:30 p.m., DJ at 10:30 p.m.  Rivals Sports Bar & Nightclub, 5 Lehns Court. 610-923-7625 or www.rivalseaston.com

Second Annual Easton Comedy Night: 8 p.m. Easton comedienne Liz Russo will host a comedy show featuring nationally known comics Keith Purnell, Alex House, and Regina DeCicco. Free, for those 18 and over. Beer, wine, and light dinner fare will be available, provided by Porters' Pub. In case of rain, the show will be postponed until Friday, September 13. Riverside Park Amphitheatre, Larry Holmes Drive, just north of the free bridge. For more info, click here.

Brook Shive and the 45s: 8 p.m. The Riegelsville Inn, 12 Delaware Road, Riegelsville. 610-749-0100 or www.riegelsvilleinn.com

Paul Kendall: 9 p.m. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com

Schubert &  Binder: 9 p.m. Colonial Pizza & Spaghetti House, 136-138 Spring Garden St. 610-252-3033 or www.colonialpizzapub.com

DJ Mikey Z: 10 p.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Pam Purvis & The Blue Skies: 10 p.m. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

Christopher Dean's Band: 10 p.m. Pearly Baker's Alehouse, 11 Centre Square. 610-253-9949 or www.pearlybakers.net


Saturday, July 20


Easton Farmers' Market: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The oldest continuous open-air farmers' market in the United States. Centre Square. www.eastonfarmersmarket.com

Boy Scouts Troop 3 Car Wash: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Merchants Bank, 1250 Braden St., Forks Township. 484-548-6095 or 484-548-6084

RE:find Grand Opening: Ribbon cutting at 11:30 a.m., followed by cookies and coffee, free ice cream samples of a custom RE:find ice cream flavor by the Bank Street Creamery from 2 to 4 p.m., music by DJ Telly with free food bites from 5 to 8 p.m. RE:find is a home furnishings store focusing on environmentally responsible and sustainably sourced home furnishings and gifts. The grand opening will also highlight the work of Pablo Molgora, in a show, titled "Icons Revised". 437 Northampton St. 610-829-1313 or www.refindeaston.com.

Heritage Walk in Hugh Moore Park: 1:30 p.m. Walking tour of canal structures, visit the Change Bridge and locktender's house. Conducted by Charles Derr, retired park ranger. Free, approximately 1 1/2 hours long.  Weather permitting, begins at the Canal Boat Store. Hugh Moore Park, 2750 Hugh Moore Park Road.

Riverside Jazz Explosion: 7 p.m. Leaf Cigar Bar, 90 Mort Drive, Forks Township. 610-559-1336

The Large Flowerheads, DJ Nicky K: Band at 7:30 p.m., DJ at 10:30 p.m.  Rivals Sports Bar & Nightclub, 5 Lehns Court. 610-923-7625 or www.rivalseaston.com

Free Texas Hold'em: 7 & 9 p.m. La Pazza, 1251 Ferry St. 610-515-0888 or www.lapazza.com

Lelica, BD Lenz & Doug Hawk: 8 p.m. Maxim's 22, 322 Northampton St. 610-252-2622 or www.maxims22.com

Andy Killcoyne & Friends: 8 p.m. The Riegelsville Inn, 12 Delaware Road, Riegelsville. 610-749-0100 or www.riegelsvilleinn.com

Second Chance Rodeo: 8 p.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Trevor Purdy & Scott Young: 9 p.m. Colonial Pizza & Spaghetti House, 136-138 Spring Garden St. 610-252-3033 or www.colonialpizzapub.com

TBA: 9 p.m. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com

Connie Edinger: : 9 p.m. The Widow's Tavern, 200 Main St., Stockertown. 610-365-8890 or www.widowstavern.com

Karaoke with Nort: 9 p.m. Rip Van Winkle's Pub, 3700 Nicholas St., Palmer Township. 610-258-8873

Frank Giasullo: 9:30 p.m. The Lafayette Bar, 11 North 4th Street 610-252-0711 or www.lafayettebarjazz.com

Madame Freak & The Funky Fever: 10 p.m. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

Dear Anna: 10 p.m. Pearly Baker's Alehouse, 11 Centre Square. 610-253-9949 or www.pearlybakers.net

"Dance-a-Palooza": 10 p.m. With a DJ. Mesa Modern Mexican, 42 South Third St. 610-829-2101 or www.mesamexican.com


Sunday, July 21


Blues Jam with BC Combo: 5:30 p.m. Bella Luna, 3417 Sullivan Trail, Forks Township. 610-253-7458

Open Mic Hosted by Jim Stocker: 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Industry Night: 10 p.m.  Rivals Sports Bar & Nightclub, 5 Lehns Court. 610-923-7625 or www.rivalseaston.com


Save the Date!


The Easton Hispanic Cultural Festival is Saturday, July 27, noon to 9:30 p.m. in Scott Park. Live music and entertainment, food, and much more is planned for this special event. Fireworks over the river beginning at 9 p.m. too! Click here for more details.

The Easton Farmers' Market "Zucchini 500" will take place on Saturday, July 27 during regular market hours, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Postponed due to predictions of a continuation of the weeklong heat wave, participants build their own race vehicles from zucchini and then compete to see who has engineered the speediest squash on wheels. Click here for more details.Easton's most comprehensive guide to what's happening over the weekend, in the city and beyond, is published every Friday.

Are you planning an event? Did we miss something? Let us know! Email us.

Sponsoring the Weekend Guide is an excellent way to advertise your local business. Plus, you get a permanent link to your website, also a great way to drive more traffic to your door. It's affordable too. Email us for details.

Scene in Easton: A Young Entrepreneur Takes Advantage of the Heat Wave


Sydnay Dennis, 10, sits by her lemonade stand outside her parents' hair salon, Sydlex Styles, on Ferry Street in Downtown Easton Thursday afternoon.
While most that could retreated indoors to cool, air conditioned spaces in Thursday's record temperatures, Sydnay Dennis, 10, saw the continuing heat wave as an opportunity to make some extra cash selling bottled water, lemonade, and face paint.

The West Ward tween said she plans on running the stand in front of her parents' salon throughout the summer while she's off from school. While relatively few people were seen walking around Easton's Downtown Thursday, by midafternoon she'd made about $15 from thirsty passersby, she said.

Sydnay's venture is good practice for what will undoubtedly be a bright future as an entrepreneur when she grows up.

"I want to run my own lemonade and ice cream shop," she said.

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Report of Armed Suicidal Man Closes Ferry Street, Disrupts Summer Nights Program

By Christina Georgiou


Numerous police vehicles and officers were called to the scene of a house
on the 1200 block of Ferry Street Thursday evening for a report of an
armed man who reportedly threatened to harm himself.
Reports of an armed man "tearing up" his house and fears that he was planning to commit suicide disrupted the city's Summer Nights program and had the entire 1200 block of Ferry Street shut down for nearly two hours this evening.

Police say they received a report shortly after 6 p.m. of a man at his residence on Ferry Street just west of Cherry Street armed with multiple firearms who threatened to harm himself. Numerous police officers, along with a car from the Northampton County Sheriff's office, an Easton EMS ambulance, and a few members of the Easton Fire Department were also called to the scene.

The man's wife exited the house safely but was worried he planned to commit suicide, authorities said.

Police said they attempted to communicate with the unidentified man, but were initially unsuccessful. Just as they called special response officers and were seen being about to deploy a robot with a camera, the man, barefoot and shirtless, peacefully surrendered.

The unidentified man surrended and was transported by
ambulance to a local hospital, as worried-looking family
members watch.
EPD officers quickly took him into custody, and, handcuffed, the man was put into a waiting ambulance.

"While we were setting up negotiations, he surrendered peacefully," EPD Captain Scott Casterline said, adding that the man did not appear to be intoxicated.

The man was transported to a local hospital for evaluation, Casterline said.

"At this point, he is not facing any criminal charges," Casterline said. He added that the unidentified resident does not appear to have a criminal record and the EPD has not had prior dealings with him nor have they been called to the address for anything similar before.

"He just had a bad day, I guess," Casterline said.

Police found firearms in the house, but they were all legally owned, police said. The exact number of weapons was not immediately available, but Casterline estimated there were between two and six involved in Thursday evening's incident.

Several neighboring residents were forced to wait behind police lines to reenter their homes during the incident. Those that were home at the time of the event were not evacuated. A number of Summer Nights program participants were delayed from leaving the scene until the conclusion because their cars were parked behind police barricade lines.

Casterline credited the neighborhood with making authorities' jobs easier, especially in the heat. Summer Nights program participants quickly cleared Centennial Park when police ordered them away for their safety, and the immediate neighbors of the man who was the center of the incident were helpful, he said.

"There was a high level of cooperation from the neighbors," he said.

And, at least some neighbors were grateful for the EPD's professionalism in handling the situation.

"I'm glad everything turned out good. I thought there was going to be a worse outcome," said Henry Rivera, who lives about a block away and said he's been a friend of the unidentified man for about eight years . "I'm glad it turned out peacefully."

He added, "A lot of people talk about the Easton Police Department, but I think they did a great job. They treated him gently. They even gave him a cigarette."

Ferry Street was reopened to traffic at about 8 p.m., and residents that had been prevented from accessing their homes were also let back in.

No one was physically injured during the event.

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Local Town Crier Headed to Canada for World Championships

By Christina Georgiou

Easton's appointed town crier, David Rose, as seen at
the city's Heritage Day celebration earlier this month.
Rose is headed to Canada in August to compete at
the World Invitational Town Crier Championships.
David Rose, Easton's official appointed town crier, will be heading to Kingston in Ontario, Canada on August 1 to represent the city at the World Invitational Town Crier Championships, Mayor Sal Panto's office announced today.

The five day competition will feature more than 30 town criers from Canada, Belgium, the Netherlands, England, New Zealand, and the United States. 

Rose will be accompanied by his wife, Kimberly Rose, who will act as his "escort". In the "Queen’s Jubilee Competition" held last year in Bracebridge, Ontario, she received recognition as “Best Dressed Escort” for her Victorian era ensemble.

At the August event, competitors will be judged on their ability to deliver a prepared "cry", the topic of which is assigned before the competition, in the open air before a panel of judges without the use of any electronic amplification. The First Prime Minister of Canada, Sir John A. MacDonald, and a response to the question of whether Kingston should have remained the capital of Canada instead of it being moved to Ottawa will be the subject addressed at this year's Town Crier Championships. Judges' evaluation of competitors' performances are based on a variety of criteria.

Each crier will also be required to perform a "hometown cry", which will give Rose the opportunity to present the City of Easton to an international audience, Wednesday announcement noted.

Rose said he plans to base his entry on an 1893 edition of The Easton Express that highlighted the many successful city businesses of the day and will perform the cry in period Victorian attire.

"It's going to be a promotional cry, encouraging businesses to relocate to Easton," he said.

Many of the most serious town criers from around the world are local history buffs, and use their town crying to spread the word about their city of origin, Rose said.

"This is the first time I've competed at this level," he added. "It's a great chance too to promote Easton."

Veggie Van Proves to Be a Hit with Local Residents

By Christina Georgiou

The Easton "Veggie Van" arrives Tuesday evening at Centennial Park
in the city's West Ward, with an estimated 300 pounds of fresh, locally
grown produce for distribution to enthusiastic residents.
Contributed photo by Larry Malinconico.
Loaded with an estimated 300 pounds of locally grown fresh produce, the new Easton Veggie Van was scheduled to be at the city's Summer Nights program for an hour and a half Tuesday evening. Stuffed to the gills, organizers wondered if they'd brought more food than they could distribute.

Instead, more than 90 percent of the vegetables were eagerly snatched up in about 15 minutes.

Less than an hour later, Veggie Van volunteers packed up, with only four zucchini and eight leaves of collard greens remaining.

The project, one of several to get more fresh, healthy food into the hands of Easton residents, is a collaboration between the West Ward Neighborhood Partnership and Lafayette College's Technology Clinic, which has been studying ways to make healthy food more accessible in the city neighborhood where many don't have cars and struggle to make ends meet.

Lynne Holden, with the West Ward
Neighborhood Partnership, assists
with bagging collard greens, while
right, Lafayette student Tech Clinic
coordinator Allie Nagurney, stands
ready with recipes to distribute.
 The Veggie Van--a small pickup truck, actually--came laden with 80 pounds of cucumbers, 100 pounds of zucchini, 40 pounds of summer squash, buckets of collard greens and swiss chard, beets, carrots, string beans, potatoes, rutabagas, cabbages and onions, along with some herbs like basil and parsley. All the produce was grown locally, coming from the Lafayette farm project, the Easton Urban Farm, the Crayola garden, and various other community gardens around the city.

The Tech Clinic has been working on coming up with solutions to much of the West Ward being a "food desert"--defined in this case as a mostly low-income neighborhood where many residents don't have a vehicle and live more than a mile from the closest full-service grocery store--for the past two years, said Lafayette College geology professor Larry Malinconico, who serves as the group's advisor.

Students in the clinic come from a variety of backgrounds and majors, and aim to come up with solutions to local issues using an interdisciplinary approach. This year, the group decided to focus on better ways to get fresh food to those who may have difficulty getting to a grocery store  or affording it a the city's twice weekly farmers' market.

Nearly completely cleaned out of food in less than an hour,
the Veggie Van crew is ready to pack up.

While the city has a number of community gardens, these weren't solving the problem of getting fresh food to residents either, he said.

"People weren't coming to the community gardens, and (the vegetables) were getting wasted," Malinconico said.

The Tech Clinic looked at what people in other communities were doing to solve their issues, and eventually decided to try "the ice cream truck" model--that is, bringing the food to the neighborhood, he said.

Lafayette sophomore Allie Nagurney, who serves as the project's student coordinator, said the approach seems to be a success so far.

"Once it was announced, everyone wanted some," she said, adding that the truck will be visiting various locations in the West Ward weekly for the next five or six weeks.

A Veggie Van enthusiast sets off for home.
 The method of distribution will probably be tweaked for the Veggie Van's appearance next week, she added. While this week was certainly a success, and about 40 people were recipients of the truck's bounty, some received more produce than others, and some vegetables ran out before others had the chance to get them.

But Nagurney had no complaints about the food going so quickly and said the project seems to be a success so far.

"We worked really hard to make this happen," she said, adding that she hopes the Veggie Van will become a permanent fixture in the neighborhood for years to come.

"We're hoping to make this a yearly thing," she said. "We want to make it sustainable."

For now, the vegetables are free, though donations to help offset costs are welcomed.

Running the Tech Clinic costs about $8,000 annually, Malinconico estimated, noting that it's the one program Lafayette doesn't fund, and that he and students must cover the costs of the projects the program undertakes themselves.

Along with the produce, the volunteers also handed out recipes for the individual vegetables on hand, which might eventually provide one source of offset revenue for the future.

"It would be fun to get a little cookbook together by the end of the summer too," Nagurney said.

Next week, the Veggie Van will be stopping at South 10th and Pine streets, the site of one community garden in the West Ward, beginning at 5:30 p.m.

The community garden at South 10th and Pine streets will
be the site of the next Veggie Van stop, next Monday,
beginning at 5:30 p.m.

Expected to be on the truck are zucchini, cucumbers, beets, summer squash, beans, carrots, lettuce and other greens, onion, garlic, and more, Nagurney said, adding that the program will continue weekly, on Mondays, for the next five or six weeks.

Next Monday's location was deliberately chosen to further help raise awareness and hopefully help residents begin to grow their own summer crops too, Malinconico said.

"We want people to know where the community gardens are," he said.



Beyond next Monday, July 22, future Veggie Van drop-off locations are yet to be determined. Bookmark this page and check back for more dates--we'll provide updates as soon as they're announced.