Tuesday, April 30, 2013

If You Can't Beat It, Eat It: Dandelions

By Christina Georgiou

Recently, there's been a lot of attention in Easton being given to the idea of urban gardening, particularly to grow healthier food, and also to the environmental detriments of invasive plant species in the local area.


The idea that the city is a "food desert" has also been floated around a bit, though technically there is no neighborhood that strictly qualifies as one. (To be considered a true "food desert" there needs to be a lack of a dedicated grocery store in a two-mile radius. While it's true three out of four of Easton's neighborhoods don't have a supermarket and it would be a much better thing if they did, all four neighborhoods are within the two-mile reach of one.)

While we are definitely supportive of urban gardening and growing food, favor native plants over invasive ones, and would very much like to see more healthy (and more affordable) foods sold in neighborhood stores, there's one idea that we think is a bit neglected--what already is available and what to do with it.

Over the next few weeks, we'll be highlighting a few edible, healthy plants you may not have noticed  (or just call "weeds") that grow all around the Easton area...

These happy dandelions have no idea they're about to
become dinner.
Dandelions are probably the one plant everyone, regardless of their level of botanical expertise, can identify on sight and even at a distance. They're also one of those things that pretty much everyone has an opinion on.

Kids usually like them because it's one flower they can pick without getting into trouble, not to mention it's fun to blow the seeds and make`a wish.

Those that are obsessed about their lawns are usually more of the opinion that dandelions were sent by the devil specifically to vex them and ruin their otherwise perfect carpets of green.

It's true that dandlions are an invasive plant, though no more so than those surburban lawns, which are almost exclusively made up of non-native grasses themselves.

Like the majority of invasive plants, dandelions were brought to North America's shores deliberately--many times over a couple of centuries, in fact, by a number of different groups of immigrants who brought the plant along to grow in their gardens for both the tasty greens and also for the plant's medicinal qualities.

Those with gourmet tastes know that buying dandelion greens and roots are pricy, if you can find them at all.

But this time of year, dandelions are everywhere, free for the taking. And, if you know what to do with them, they're delicious. 

A bit of foraged bounty: baby dandelion leaves, dandelion
flowers, both whole and just the centers, which will be made
into tea, syrup, and wine. Wild onion grass, far left, added
a bit of extra flavor to dandelion fritters.
Most foraging guides suggest the baby leaves are best picked before the dandelions bloom, before they pick up a too-bitter flavor, and they're probably correct. But I found this past weekend that in areas with many dandelions, there are still plenty of baby leaves out there.

Baby leaves make a very tasty salad, either by themselves or mixed with other greens, like a spring lettuce mix--no fancy prep needed. Just pick and rinse. Toss a bowlful with olive oil, lemon juice and sprinkle with a dash salt and pepper, and you're good to go. Or do it with a nice vinagrette, if you're so inclined.

Dandelion greens are highly nutritious, packed with more vitamins and phytonutrients than anything you'll find in the produce aisle of the supermarket. Folate, magnesium, phosphorus and copper, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), vitamin K, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, calcium, iron, potassium and manganese all come packed in those awesome little leaves. They're also a very good source of dietary fiber and have a number of other reported health benefits.

A cup of the raw greens only contains 25 calories, too, so feel free to indulge and have two or three.

Oddly enough, a bowl of raw baby dandelion greens is actually quite satisfying. There's a theory out there that many of the people that are overweight and/or obese because they're actually malnourished from eating a processed food diet, and as a result, their bodies are desperately trying to compensate by sending signals they need more food to get more of the lacking nutrients. From what I've experienced in the last couple of days, with a dandelion salad being more than sufficient for lunch, I have to wonder if it's not true.

Baby dandelion greens, with olive oil, lemon juice and a tiny
bit of sea salt. Yum! Looks like the kind of salad you'd pay
a pretty penny for in a pricy gourmet restaurant, doesn't it?
If you find that it's past the season for baby greens, the more mature ones are quite good steamed or boiled, much like you'd prepare spinach. Later in the season, doing a quick boil, then draining the leaves, and doing a second quick boil again should remove the intense bitterness without losing all the nutritious goodness dandelion plants have to offer.

Serve cooked dandelion greens with a little chopped garlic, lemon juice, and/or some butter or olive oil. Again, it's quite delicious.

While dandelion flowers are most often associated with making wine (which I've done in past years, and plan to again this year), they can also be brewed into a very nice tea, which I personally usually enjoy with a bit of honey, iced.

Dandelion syrup, which I haven't tried yet, is also apparently a classic and easy to prepare.

But the most appealing recipe for dandelion flowers I've found so far is dandelion flower fritters!

I just discovered this concept, and having tried my own variation based off of several different recipe versions this past weekend, I can vouch that they are really, really awesome, and nothing like what you might imagine either.

Dandelion fritters may be healthy, but they're not at all reminiscent of "health food." They taste quite sinful, actually, but still carry all the good stuff that dandelions have to offer in the way of nutritional goodness.

The prep is quite simple and easy--if you can make pancakes, you can make dandelion fritters. If you've got kids, I'd imagine they'll not only enjoy these as much as adults, but they'd probably love to help out with the gathering too.

Gather a mixing bowl full of dandelion flowers, whole, just the tops with the stems removed, and give them a good rinsing. No need to dry them off, just shake off the excess water--a colander works well. (Actually, you can even just gather them into a collander in the first place...) Big flowers are easier to fry up than little ones.

Dandelion flower fritters in the making...
For the batter, mix together one cup of flour with one egg and a cup of milk.

For a savory flavor, add some onion and/or garlic powder to the batter, or while you're out getting the dandelions, pull a few young strands of onion grass and chop it up finely before mixing it into the batter.

Take each flower and dip it face down into the batter. Give it a twirl to get some batter between all those tiny petals.

Drop each flower onto a hot lightly oiled griddle or frying pan for about 2-3 minutes. When lightly browned, turn each flower over (a fork works best), and cook the other side too.

Dandelion fritters are amazingly yummy!
For a sweet breakfast or dessert version, you can sprinkle the plain version of the fritters lightly with confectioner's sugar. If you've gone for the savory version, a tiny bit of sea salt brings out the flavor nuances. 

Eat immediately. On the off-chance there are any left, they reheat in a toaster oven or conventional oven easily.

This is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to dandelions. The roots are commonly dried and brewed into a healthy coffee substitute, and there are many other recipes out there for the rest of the plant too.

If you have a family or favorite recipe for dandelions, please share it with us in the comments! We'd love to know about it.

A field of dandelions that sits near the Bushkill Creek in the City of Easton.
Foraging for dandelions and other edible plants is not only fun, but it's free!

Still, there are some very important things to keep in mind when foraging for edibles:

  • Make sure the area you pull from hasn't been treated with herbicides and pesticides. If you have a service like ChemLawn, eating the weeds from your property is a very bad idea. And while it's true that modern farming makes use of some of the same chemicals, herbicide and pesticide use in residential areas is many times more per acre than farmers use on crops.   It takes a number of years of non-use before it's safe to eat plants in areas heavily treated with these chemicals. That said, other than pesticides/herbicides applied by local residents themselves, urban Easton's backyards seem to be mostly free of this problem.
  • Many public spaces, such as parks, are treated with pesticides and herbicides, and plants picked directly from roadsides carry the risk of lead, road salt, petrochemicals, and other extremely unhealthy things. Additionally, some roadway edges in the local area are treated with herbicides by PennDOT to help keep them clear of obscuring vegetation. Sites on or near old abandoned industrial properties are not usually a good idea either--poisons like PCBs may well lurk in the soil and be carried into the plants. Be sure the area you're picking from is free from such hazards. Areas along protected waterways, nature trails, abandoned fields, and woodland areas are usually a safe bet.
  • Respect public laws and private property. While it's very rare anyone has any objections to someone picking their unwanted plants, particularly problematic invasive ones, they very likely will have objections to a stranger unexpectedly hanging around their house or on their lawn without permission. However, if you ask nicely and explain what you're doing in advance, a homeowner or resident may well give their blessing to your endeavor. And if someone shows up and asks you to leave, apologize and do so immediately.

Public Input Wanted for Local Planning Initiatives


Local planners are continuing to seek community input to be used in planning what the City of Easton and the Lehigh Valley should look like in the future, and to that effect, two upcoming public meetings are scheduled to gather residents' ideas.
The City of Easton will hold a public meeting to gather input to be used in its  comprehensive plan rewrite on Monday, May 13, beginning at 6 6:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army, located at 1110 Northampton St.

The Comprehensive Plan rewrite process will be coordinated by the Easton planning staff, with oversight and input from Mayor Sal Panto, the Easton Planning Commission, and city council members. Refreshments will be provided to participants by the West Ward Neighborhood Partnership.
This meeting is the latest in a series of such events held in various locations around the city. A similar meeting to gather input in the West Ward was held late last year at the Easton Area Community Center, and the meeting on May 13 specifically hopes to gather more input from West Ward residents.
More meetings are planned be held in other neighborhoods in the city in the near future to gather information from those residents, Easton Planning Director Becky Bradley said.
The Comprehensive Plan rewrite process will continue over the next two years, with a projected 2015 adoption of a new plan, she added.
Public participation, along with data review, will guide the rewrite process, officials have said.
"To date we have spoken to over 400 people and expect that we will have active participation of over a thousand by the end of June," Bradley said.  "All meeting notes will be aggregated and then presented in a large public forum this summer, moving us into the establishment of goals and objectives for the City Comprehensive Plan."
At 8 p.m. on the same evening, Monday, May 13, Envision Lehigh Valley will be holding a virtual town hall meeting for those that missed their meetings last fall but would still like to share their ideas for the region's future.
Using the uStream, participants can watch and talk with planners from Allentown, Bethlehem, Easton, and the Lehigh Valley Planning Commission.
Envision Lehigh Valley says the format will allow members of the public and officials to share information about economic development, answer questions from the virtual audience, and have a two-way conversation online from wherever they are.
Those wishing to be part of the regional process can also submit ideas and concerns by:
  • Tweeting short messages to @EnvisionTheLV
  • Writing questions on the "EnvisionLehighValley" Facebook wall
  • Sending emails to smartgrowth@renewlv.org
For more information about the Envision Lehigh Valley virtual town hall meeting and other upcoming planning events being held by the group, click here.
Lehigh Valley residents are also invited to complete two online surveys to help guide the regional planning process. Click here to view them or take part.

Updated on Monday, May 13 at 3:45 p.m. to correct the time at which the Easton meeting will take place.

Monday, April 29, 2013

Easton Police Search South Side Residence

Easton police searched a residence at 139 Scott St. in the South Side neighborhood of the city today at about 3:15 p.m., the EPD reports.

The contents of the search warrant is currently sealed, and the investigation was undertaken by the Easton Police Criminal Investigations Division on behalf of the Brooklyn New York District Attorney’s office, police said in a media release.

Representatives from the DA’s Office were present when the warrant was served, and unspecified  evidence was seized from the property, local officials added.

Residents at the property refused to open the door, and police encountered two aggressive dogs after breaching the door, Easton Lieutenant Matt Gerould said.

It is unclear whether any suspects were taken into custody as a result of the search.

When reached by phone, a media spokesperson for the Brooklyn New York District Attorney’s office said he was unable to give out any further information about the event, other than that it was part of a larger ongoing investigation.

He also cited that the warrant is still sealed and said he had no further information about when more information about the case might be released.

Editor's note: We will update this story as more facts about the case are released.

Updated at 6:06 p.m. and again on Tuesday, April 30 at 12:27 a.m.

Spring Plant Exchange Set for Saturday

The West Ward Neighborhood Partnership will hold its annual spring plant exchange this Saturday, May 4 from noon to 3 p.m. at 630 Northampton St.

Those who would like to participate should bring a plant, clearly marked, to exchange for another variety at the swap. Bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and plants of all varieties are all welcome.

The WWNP Neighborhood Physical Quality and Natural Resources committees will also be offering rain barrels, tomato buckets, herbs, house plants, and flowering bedding plants for sale at the event.

A limited amount of shrubs will also be available for a suggested donation, an announcement about the event said.

For more information or questions about the event, call 610-515-0891.

Click here to download a pdf of the event poster.

This Week in Easton, April 29 to May 2

This week brings April to an end...So break out your May pole and do a little dance. No? Okay, just enjoy a few of the things on our weekly list then.


Monday, April 29


Forks of the Delaware Shad Fishing Tournament and Festival: Continues all this week, runs through Friday, May 3. Scott Park, Larry Holmes Drive, just south of the free bridge.

Palmer Township Shade Tree Commission meeting: 6:30 p.m. In the Palmer Library meeting room, at the Municipal Complex, 1 Weller Place (off of Newburg Road), Palmer Township.

Tuesday, April 30


Bird Walk: 7:30 a.m. to noon. Join Preserve Manager and Natural Lands Trust Wildlife Coordinator Tim Burris to hunt for the chestnut-sided warbler, eastern bluebird, and other species that call Mariton Wildlife Sanctuary forests and meadows home. Wear sturdy walking shoes, and bring a water bottle. No preregistration is necessary. Free. Walks will meet in the parking lot. Walk will proceed in misty conditions but cancel in case of downpour or lightning. Mariton Wildlife Sanctuary, Sunnyside Road (from Rte.611, take Spring Hill Road, make a right onto Sunnyside, follow it to the end), Williams Township. Click here for more information or email timburris@natlands.org
Duplicate Bridge: 11:30 a.m. Temple Covenant of Peace, 1451 Northampton St.

Beyond Cakes Bakery Ribbon Cutting: 5 to 7 p.m. Includes free samples and givaways. 1700 Sullivan Trail, Forks Township.


Wednesday, May 1


Easton Planning Commission meeting: 6:30 p.m. City Hall, city council chambers, 6th floor, 1 South Third St.

Brian Dean Moore: 7 p.m. The Widow's Tavern, 200 Main St., Stockertown. 610-365-8890 or www.widowstavern.com

Texas Hold'em: 7 & 9 p.m. Free. La Pazza, 1251 Ferry St. 610-515-0888 or www.lapazza.com

"On Aging": 8 p.m. Based on interviews with Lehigh Valley senior citizens, this original collaborative theater piece merges poetry, artwork, video, and music to tell their stories in a live performance. Tickets are $6. Lafayette College, Williams Center for the Arts, 317 Hamilton St. 610-330-5009 or williamscenter.lafayette.edu

Jam Session: 8 p.m. Rivals, 5 Lehn's Court (just off Centre Square). 610-392-2932 or www.rivalseaston.com

Open Mic with Scott Harrington: 9:30 p.m. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com


Thursday, May 2


Williams Township Landfill Advisory Committee meeting: 8 a.m. Williams Township Municipal Complex, 655 Cider Press Road, Williams Township.

Northampton County Economic Development Committee Meeting: 5 p.m. County Council Meeting Room, third floor, Northampton County Courthouse, 669 Washington St.

Northampton County Council meeting: 6:30 p.m. County Council Meeting Room, third floor, Northampton County Courthouse, 669 Washington St.

Forks Township Board of Supervisors work session: 7 p.m. Forks Township Municipal Complex, 1606 Sullivan Trail, Forks Township.

"On Aging": 8 p.m. Based on interviews with Lehigh Valley senior citizens, this original collaborative theater piece merges poetry, artwork, video, and music to tell their stories in a live performance. Tickets are $6. Lafayette College, Williams Center for the Arts, 317 Hamilton St. 610-330-5009 or williamscenter.lafayette.edu

B.D. Lenz: 8 p.m. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

Bring (or wear) Your Own Vinyl night: 8 p.m. to midnight. With the Easton Record Exchange. Black & Blue, 683 Walnut St. 610-438-3604 or blackandblueeaston.com

Karaoke: 8 p.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Mike McLoughlin: 9 p.m. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com

Open Mic with Nick Levinos: 9:30 p.m. Pearly Bakers, 11 Centre Square. 610-253-9949 or www.pearlybakers.net

"This Week in Easton" lists what's happening during the weekdays, from special events to who's playing to government meetings, all in one handy place. Not just in the City of Easton, but for the entire greater Easton area...Published every Monday morning!

Is there a community or entertainment event you'd like to see here? Are you organizing something you'd like to have posted? Did we miss something? Email us!

Sunday, April 28, 2013

Scene in Easton: A West Ward Car Wash

Xavier Dunbar, 7, of Bethlehem, and Najee Peterson, 8, of Easton, do their part
by helping to advertise for the car wash.
Photos by Christina Georgiou




Members of Holy Temple of Easton on Ferry Street took advantage of the beautiful weather yesterday to offer a car wash to passersby and raise a little cash for their church





 
Church members wait for customers, left, and when one
arrives, it gets the full treatment.



Saturday, April 27, 2013

Nurture Nature Launches Fundraising Campaign for Urban Garden Project

By Christina Georgiou

Rachel Hogan talks about Nurture Nature Center's plan for
an "Urban Recycle Garden" Friday evening.

It's been part of the Nurture Nature Center's (NNC) plan from the beginning to incorporate urban gardening and an educational program to go with it into their facility on Northampton Street, and now after five years of operation, it may finally happen.

The Center launched with a Kickstarter campaign party Friday evening, attended by nearly 100 people, to highlight its plan to create an "Urban Recycle Garden", which requires $8,000 to become a reality.

"We're really excited about this program," said Rachel Hogan, NNC's director. "We have a really beautiful vision of how we can use that area and demonstrate how people can grow their own food."

Works by Pat Delluva, Jody Matthews, Sydney McGinley,
Patti Tinsman-Schaffer, Kay Stauffer, and Todd Stone,
Nurture Nature Center's latest art exhibit, were on display
during the fundraising campaign launch. Additionally,
"Riverview" by Easton artist Isadore LaDuca, which
he donated to the center, was also on view.
 The initial phase of the garden will be at ground level just off of Pine Street behind the NNC building. The majority of the cost will go towards building a system to collect rainwater from the roof of the center, which will also be useful towards mitigating stormwater runoff. Other costs include building a trellis along the center's back wall to grow vegetables and vines, basic supplies such as soil, and to create handouts and other educational materials about the garden so visitors will be able to recreate some of the ideas.

"One of the things we're going to do is leverage it as an educational tool," Hogan said. "We want to demonstrate things people can do at their own homes."

The majority of the garden's containers will be recycled, and the emphasis will be on practical gardening, said NNC's Kate Brandes, who is a licensed professional geologist, certified floodplain manager, and a Penn State Master Gardener.

"I think the bottom line for me is this is a project for regular people. It's different from a community garden or a green roof," she said.
Kate Brandes looks out over the roof and area behind
Nurture Nature Center, which the organization hopes to
transform into a blooming garden this summer.

If the Kickstarter campaign exceeds the $8,000 goal, Nurture Nature plans to apply the money to continuing the green space, creating a rooftop garden just above the back wall of the building.

That part of the project has also been in the works from the beginning, Brandes said, but is more costly.

Needed are a structural certification from a licensed engineer stating the roof can hold the weight of the garden, as well as modifications to the fire escape balcony to make it safer for visitors. Additionally, the center would like to replace the heavy fire doors that lead to the fire escape with paned-glass ones so the garden will be visible from the  third floor "Science on a Sphere" room above.

Friday evening, a number of people were seen donating toward the project, some through the Kickstarter campaign, and others writing checks directly. By the end of the evening, $2,500 had been garnered for the project, in addition to NNC's Kickstarter campaign.

The online effort runs through Saturday, May 25 at 10 p.m. and had garnered $440 in pledges from 11 backers as of late Friday night. By mid-Saturday afternoon, the amount had grown to $765.

If Nurture Nature Center reaches it's goal, the garden project will be implemented immediately and yield its first crops this summer, Brandes said.

Additionally, the center is planning a campaign closing party for the backers on Thursday, May 30.

Brandes said she's very much looking forward to making the garden a reality.

"We've been waiting to do this for five years," she said.

To contribute to the Nurture Nature Center's Urban Recycle Garden or view more details about the planned project, click here to visit their page on Kickstarter.

For more about Nurture Nature Center and its mission, visit the organization's website.

Updated at 1:57 p.m.

Friday, April 26, 2013

Woman Charged with Littering After Bomb Scare

By Christina Georgiou

Members of the Northampton County Bomb Squad prepare
to investigate a suspicious bag that was tossed from a car
along Northampton Street late Tuesday morning. The
purse was later deemed harmless, but the incident shut down
surrounding roads for nearly two hours, and numerous
personnel from the Easton Police and the Easton Fire
department were involved in the event.
A New York woman will be charged with littering after she tossed a purse out onto Northampton Street near Seventh Street in Easton's West Ward late Tuesday morning, which resulted in a bomb scare that shut down roads in the immediate area for nearly two hours.

Yolanda Santana, 21, formerly of Easton and now residing New York City, had just purchased a new purse at Walmart and finished transferring the contents of her bag when she decided to discard her old black bag at the side of the road from the passenger seat of her friend's car, Lt. Sam Lobb said.

The presence of the bag, which contained two boxes inside, alarmed a witness, who called police thinking the parcel might be a bomb.

While Easton police didn't have a license plate number, the white Buick with a black top was captured by the city's surveillance cameras in the area, giving authorities a good description of the distinctive-looking vehicle.

Lobb said he spotted the car parked along Walnut Street Wednesday evening and tracked down the owner, who lives in Coopersburg. She has not been charged in the incident.

Santana spoke with police at the Easton police station later that evening and admitted tossing the bag, Lobb said.

"She didn't intend to cause harm," Lobb said. "She just didn't think and tossed the bag."

Santana will also be held responsible for expenses incurred by the mobilization the Northampton County Bomb Squad, the Easton Fire Department, and Easton police officers during the incident.

The littering charge carries a fine of $50 to 300.

An estimate of the costs of mobilizing the numerous emergency personnel to deal with the incident, including bomb squad personnel from Bethlehem, has not yet been tallied.

Easton Farmers Market Returns for 261st Season

The oldest continuous open air farmers' market in the U.S. will kick off its 261st year next Saturday, May 4 at 9 a.m. on Easton's Centre Square with seven new vendors and featuring a total of thirty-four farmers, food purveyors and crafters.

The market’s opening day ceremony will highlight Easton Farmers' Market (EFM) farming families and celebrate a  new generation of young, passionate farmers who are dedicated to being good stewards of the environment and to growing healthy, chemical-free food. "So God Made a Farmer," the  poem made famous by radio personality Paul Harvey, as well as speeches by Mayor Sal Panto and PA State Representative Robert Freeman, along with a ribbon cutting by a representative from St. Luke’s University Health Network, the EFM's new major sponsor, will all be part of the event.

The opening day festivities also include a tie-in with National Herb Day, which is also on May 4.  The Northern NJ Chapter of the American Herbalist Guild will be present,  selling herb plants and answering herb-related questions. Additionally, local herbalist David Harder will offer advice on growing herbs and using them in cooking and healing.

Chef Abe Lopez of Valenca restaurant will demonstrate how to cook a fresh seasonal dish incorporating spring produce and pasture-raised pork provided by EFM vendors, and registered dietician Debbie Cooper will discuss the nutritional benefits of the ingredients and offer healthy eating and cooking tips. 

The opening day event will also feature live music, free market bags for the first 61 customers and a drawing to win four tickets to the Lehigh Valley Iron Pigs game for that evening.

The EFM will also be expanding this year, with the launch of its new evening market on Wednesday, June 5.

The new Wednesday market, sponsored by Easton's Weyerbacher Brewing Company and dubbed  "Weyerbacher Wednesdays", will run 4 to 8 p.m. every week through Sept. 25.

Twenty vendors will sell at the new Wednesday market,

"This new market was created to serve the downtown’s burgeoning residential and office population. Young professionals are seeking more access to fresh, locally-produced food,  and we’re excited to be able to offer it to them," said EFM Manager Megan McBride in a media release. "The market will provide a full-service shopping experience with seasonal produce, pasture-raised meat, raw milk, yogurt and cheese, artisan bread and baked goods and prepared foods for quick weeknight meals."

For more information about the Easton Farmers' Market and other related upcoming events, visit www.eastonfarmersmarket.com

Weekend Guide, April 26 to 28

It's a great weekend to do some gardening and/or spring cleaning, and there's opportunity to do both. Then, why not treat yourself and have a good time out on the town too...


Friday, April 26


Earth Night event: 6 to 9 p.m. The event will feature two new art exhibits and the launch of Nurture Nature Center's fundraising campaign to support their "Urban Recycle Garden", which "will demonstrate beautiful, creative and low-cost ways people can grow food and manage stormwater." Nurture Nature Center, 518 Northampton St. www.nurturenaturecenter.com RSVPs from those attending are appreciated--email here.

Line Dancing: 7 to 10:30 p.m. Lessons at 7:15 p.m. $5 per person for members, $6 for non-members. Tatamy Fire Company, 164 Bushkill St., Tatamy. 610-759-2786 or www.purecountrydancers.com

Notorious Grooves, DJ Massimo: Band at 7:30 p.m., DJ at 10:30 p.m.  Rivals Sports Bar & Nightclub, 5 Lehns Court. 610-923-7625 or www.rivalseaston.com

Orpheus Concert: 8 p.m.  Hugo Wolf's Italian Serenade and Arnold Schoenberg's "Transfigured Night." With Gabriel Kahane, piano and vocals. Tickets are $33. Lafayette College, Williams Center for the Arts, 317 Hamilton St. 610-330-5009 or williamscenter.lafayette.edu

Steve McDaniel: 8 p.m. The Riegelsville Inn, 12 Delaware Road, Riegelsville. 610-749-0100 or www.riegelsvilleinn.com

Pour Man’s Band: 9 p.m. Colonial Pizza & Spaghetti House, 136-138 Spring Garden St. 610-252-3033 or www.colonialpizzapub.com

Patrick Poladian: 9 p.m. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com

John Kimock Project: 10 p.m. With special guests. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

DJ Realion: 10 p.m. Pearly Baker's Alehouse, 11 Centre Square. 610-253-9949 or www.pearlybakers.net


Saturday, April 27


Easton City-wide Clean Up: Volunteers will pick up trash, plant flowers, along with other efforts to spruce up their chosen neighborhood location. At various locations in the , West Ward, Downtown and Southside. Click here for more information.

Forks of the Delaware Shad Fishing Tournament and Festival: Begins today and runs daily through May 3. Scott Park, Larry Holmes Drive (just south of the free bridge). www.shadtournament.com

Annual City of Easton Surplus Auction: Item inspection at 8 a.m., auction begins at 10 a.m. A number of unusual and unique items will be offered at this event. Easton Public Works complex, 500 Bushkill St. Click here for more information. CANCELLED (presumably a new date will be announced in the near future)

Easton City Hall open: 8:30 to noon. The city finance department will be open for  for payments of property taxes, utility bills, per capita taxes, and other tax payments. A representative of Portnoff Law offices will be there to answer questions on payment plans or filings by Portnoff on the city's behalf. 1 South Third St.

Easton Farmers' Market Winter Mart: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. This is the last weekend of the indoor market--the outdoor market on Centre Square resumes next Saturday, May 4. Fresh, local organic produce, all-natural pastured meat, farm-fresh eggs, artisan cheese and bread, baked goods, prepared foods, more. Nurture Nature Center, 518 Northampton St. 610-253-4432 or www.eastonfarmersmarket.com

Championship CFA Cat Show & Feline Agility: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Watch cats run their paces in feline agility, and meet special guest Hope, the calico exotic shorthair star of the  Toyota commercial.  Visit with exhibitors, see the cats up close and “purrsonal." Local exhibitors and shelters will also be present. Charles Chrin Community Center, 4100 Green Pond Road, Palmer Township.

Prescription Drug Drop Off: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Part of the DEA's national Take Back Initiative. Old and unused prescription drugs can be dropped off in an effort to keep narcotics off the streets. Giant Food Store, Town Center Shopping Center, Town Center Boulevard, Forks Township.

Decorated Egg Art Show & Sale: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $4 per person, free for kids 12 and under. Forks Township Community Center, 500 Zucksville Road, Forks Township. 610-252-4324 or www.eggsoriginal.com

YMCA Healthy Kids Day: Noon to 4 p.m. Easton Library story time, Easton Block Watch fingerprinting, Zumba, karate. gymnastics, rookie rugby, basketball, soccer, yoga, kid's obstacle boot camp, tennis, face painting and crafts, Easton Fire Department demonstrations, and more. Family YMCA, 1225 W. Lafayette St. www.familyymca.org

Jazz Day Celebration: 6:30 p.m. The Easton Area High School Jazz Band and Spatial Edition, a classic jazz quartet, will be featured. Free. Riverside Park Amphitheatre, Larry Holmes Drive, just north of the free bridge. Click here for more information.

Groovy 60's Dance party with The Large Flowerheads: 7 to 10 p.m. Tickets are $10 in  advance, $15, at the door. Strausser Community Center, 2400 Liberty St. 610-442-3230 or www.largeflowerheads.com

Since the Fire, OLVO, Trailer Park Sex: 7 p.m. Plus two more bands...Mother's Bar & Grille, 3 Lehn's Court (just off of Centre Square). 610-253-1012

UFC 159: 7:30 p.m. Rivals Sports Bar & Nightclub, 5 Lehns Court. 610-923-7625 or www.rivalseaston.com

Frank Giasullo: 8 p.m. The Riegelsville Inn, 12 Delaware Road, Riegelsville. 610-749-0100 or www.riegelsvilleinn.com

Burnt Orange Trio: 8 p.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Doug Hawk, BD Lenz, Kevin Soffera: 9 p.m. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com

Truth n Soul: 9 p.m. The Widow's Tavern, 200 Main St., Stockertown. 610-365-8890 or www.widowstavern.com

John Kimock Project: 10 p.m. With special guests. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

Modern Romantz: 10 p.m. Pearly Baker's Alehouse, 11 Centre Square. 610-253-9949 or www.pearlybakers.net


Sunday, April 28


Championship CFA Cat Show & Feline Agility: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Watch cats run their paces in feline agility, and meet special guest Hope, the calico exotic shorthair star of the  Toyota commercial.  Visit with exhibitors, see the cats up close and “purrsonal." Local exhibitors and shelters will also be present. Charles Chrin Community Center, 4100 Green Pond Road, Palmer Township.

Children's Fraktur Art Workshop: 10 a.m. to noon. Free, for children 8 to 12. Reservations required. The Sigal Museum, 342 Northampton St. 610-253-1222 or www.sigalmusuem.org

Decorated Egg Art Show & Sale: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Admission is $4 per person, free for kids 12 and under. Forks Township Community Center, 500 Zucksville Road, Forks Township. 610-252-4324 or www.eggsoriginal.com

Bingo and Vendor Shopping: Noon to 5 p.m. Benefits the RSD Foundation. Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Palmer Township Fire Hall, 950 South 27th St., Palmer Township.

Longaberger Basket Bingo: Doors open at 1 p.m., bingo begins at 2 p.m. Admission is $20. St. John's United Church of Christ, 651 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-749-2567

Open Mic Hosted by Jim Stocker: 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com


Save the Date!


The annual  Historic Easton House Tour, a self-guided tour of seven historic properties, three public spaces and an artisan session on restoration and preservation,  is set for Saturday, May 4, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Advance tickets for $20 are available online at www.eastonmainstreet.org and at a number of locations in the city. Tickets may also be purchased the day of the tour at Riverside Park for $25.

Easton's most comprehensive guide to what's happening over the weekend, in the city and beyond, is published every Friday.

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Last updated on Saturday, April 27, at 1:37 p.m.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

West Ward Farm Share Program Promises Weekly Fresh Produce

Clear Spring Farm and the West Ward Neighborhood Partnership (WWNP) are collaborating through the "Buy Fresh, Buy Local" program to bring a low-cost farm share program to the City of Easton. The program will run from May 29 through September 25.

The program, in which participants pledge a weekly payment in exchange for a "share" of the farm's produce, will offer a variety of in-season fresh vegetables every week. The list is likely to include: lettuce, cabbage, onions, parsley, green beans, yellow beans, cucumbers, zucchini, peppers, tomatoes, squash, sweet corn, beets, and broccoli over the course of the program.

Members do not choose their produce--the bounty will include a selection of what Clear Spring Farm has produced that week. Pick-up is every Wednesday between 6 and 7 p.m. at the First Moravian Church of Easton, 225 North Tenth St.

Both full and half-shares will be offered. A full share is designed to meet the weekly  needs of four people, and a half-share will feed two.

Members will generally receive about seven different vegetables each week, equivalent to one grocery bag of produce for a half share, and two grocery bags for a whole share.  Variety and quantity may vary.

Clear Spring Farm, located just north of the city on Richard Garr Road in Forks Township, is a "limited use" farm, which mean they avoid the use of chemicals where possible.

A full share costs $25 per week, and a half-share is $15 per week. Members must pay for their produce at the time of pick up. Payments must be made in cash, though SNAP will also be accepted for weekly payments.

Members are required to pay a two-week cash deposit to join--$50 for a full share or $30 for a  half share.  Deposits to become a farm share program member must be made in cash, and the deposit can be used to pay for the last two weeks of produce, or it may be returned at the end of the season. (SNAP will not be accepted for deposits.)

Shares that are not retrieved within the pickup time will be donated to a charity, food pantry, or the drop site host. The cost of the share will be deducted from the deposit. Those who miss two weeks will lose their place in the program. Those that cannot pick up their share on a given week may send someone else to do it for them, the announcement said.

A minimum of 10 shares need to be sold to offer the program in the city. Additionally, the program is limited to a maximum of 30 shares.

For more information or to sign up, contact the West Ward neighborhood Partnership at 610-515-0891 ext. 4200.

For more about Clear Spring Farm, visit their website at www.clearspringfarm.net

Forks of the Delaware Shad Fishing Tournament Begins on Saturday

Shad fishing is an annual Easton tradition, and this year is no exception.

Today is last day to register for the 31st annual Forks of the Delaware Shad Fishing Tournament and Festival, which officially begins at 12:01 a.m. this Saturday, April 27. The event runs until Friday, May 3.

With a grand prize of $1,000, daily prizes of $75, $50 and $25, and other prizes as well,  anglers have ample incentive to sign up and participate. Their chances of winning have increased too, since in recent years participation in the annual event has declined.

Registration is $30, and those wanting to get in on the action can sign up in person at Scott Park, on Larry Holmes Drive just south of the free bridge, from noon to 6 p.m. today.

Online registration is also available--visit www.shadtournament.com

For more information, call 610-597-SHAD or email picthefisherwoman@rcn.com

Annual Easton Citywide Cleanup Set for Saturday

The City of Easton is set to get a bit of spring cleaning this Saturday.

Volunteers will pick up trash, plant flowers and otherwise spruce up the city, with targeted areas in three out of the city's four neighborhood districts.

Downtown, the Easton Main Street Initiative will lead efforts on Centre Square, South Pine and Third streets, and along Larry Holmes Drive.

In the West Ward, litter patrol will be led by Weed and Seed's Laura Accetta and a gardening blitz at the South Tenth Street community garden will be led by Sophia Feller from the the West Ward Neighborhood Partnership.

Efforts in Vanderveer Park, Milton Street Park, and Pioneer Playground in Southside will led by Dean Young of the Boys and Girls Club of Easton and Melody Rogers of the Southside Civic Association.

The city's public works department will assist by retrieving bags of garbage picked up by the volunteers after the event.

It's not too late to get involved either. Those wishing to join existing efforts can contact any of the coordinators directly for more specific infomation, such as start times or Jamie Hartranft, Executive Assistant to the Mayor, at 610-250-6612.

Organizations or groups of individuals that would like to clean up an area not already on the list can arrange for Easton Public Works to pick up bags of trash and debris from their efforts too, by calling the department at 610-250-6680.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Nature of Easton: Common Merganser Couple Spotted Along Bushkill Creek


A pair of common mergansers sighted on the Bushkill Creek just off of Pearl Street in the City of Easton Tuesday afternoon.
 Ducks, particularly mallards, are seen every day along Easton's numerous waterways, but this pair sighted along the Bushkill Creek off of Pearl Street yesterday is likely a bit less common in the immediate area than their name suggests.

The "common merganser" is a large tree-dwelling duck that makes usually its nests in tree cavities, though it also will sometimes will choose a cliff crevice, chimney, old building, or a nest box in which to make its home. They also occasionally occupy abandoned hawk nests.

The attractive birds, which feature a serrated bill, generally dine on fish, along with mphibians, crustaceans, mollusks and other invertebrates, which they catch by diving  underwater. They prefer crystal clear waters, both fresh and salt water, presumably because it's easier to see their prey.

While native to North America, common mergansers are also found in Europe, where they are called goosanders.

The ducks pair off in late winter, and pairings may last for one season or for a number of years. They mate seasonally, with eggs being laid in May and June. Females typically lay 9 to 12 eggs.

It's uncertain whether the pair pictured is breeding locally or just passing through, as the birds do migrate. Their expected breeding area is listed as being north of Easton, with the southernmost section lying in Monroe County.

Still, the area of the Bushkill where they were sighted fits just about all the criteria for their preferred habitat, so the possibility of seeing the handsome couple with children in coming weeks seems likely, if they decide to stick around.

If they do, their ducklings will likely be seen over the summer in the same area. The young birds will accompany their mother to the feeding site within a week or so of being hatched and will be able to swim and feed on their own nearly immediately, though at first they will take their food from the water's surface instead of diving.

A little more than a week later, after mastering those skills, they will learn to dive as well.

Their mother will abandon them before they learn to fly, about a month or two after their birth. At that point, they may join other young common mergansers and form their own group, before they mature enough to reproduce themselves, usually at about two years of age.

The common merganser often lives about 13 years or more in the wild and has few natural predators. It ranges in size from about 21 to 28 inches long, and has a wingspan of about 33 to 34 inches.

After hatching, young birds follow their mothers to feeding sites. Young can swim and feed easily as soon as they leave the nest, although for the first few days most food is taken from the surface of the water. Within about 8 days, the young are skilled divers. Mothers abandon their young before they learn to fly, usually 30 to 50 days after hatching. Young mergansers join other young after being abandoned; mixed broods of more than 40 young have been observed.

Information for this article was gathered from the following web resources:

Karl Stirner Arts Trail Celebrates Grace Gate

By Christina Georgiou
Sculptor Willie Cole talks about the inspiration for "Grace Gate" at the
work's dedication ceremony Tuesday afternoon. The design
is a stylized representation of his face, with his hands clasped
in a gesture of gratitude in front of it.


The Karl Stirner Arts Trail celebrated its newest art addition Tuesday afternoon, officially dedicating "Grace Gate", created by renowned sculptor Willie Cole. The event was attended by about 25 officials, members of the public, and art students.

The iron gate sits near the northern midpoint of the trail, which runs along the Bushkill Creek in the West Ward and Downtown neighborhoods of Easton, and marks an access point to the path from Easton Cemetery. To enter the Stirner Trail, one must traverse the tunnel that runs under Route 22, and step through Grace Gate, which will stay closed most of the time, as it's designed to keep motor vehicles out, but allow pedestrians to pass through.

The proximity to the cemetery influenced Grace Gate's design, Cole said.

"I thought about the tunnel and the entrance between life and death," he told the assembled crowd. "I enjoyed the fact too that the gate was not to stop people, but to stop cars."

The gate's design is in keeping with its name, the artist said.

"I was coming to the realization of the importance of giving thanks," Cole said, explaining that the work is a stylized representation of his face, with his hands clasped in a gesture of gratitude in front of it.

The eyes on the gate are open, because "I wanted to keep the play of light moving," he added.

"I would have loved to have created a gate on the other side too, to create a dialogue between the two. Maybe I'll raise the money and donate it to the city," Cole said.

The artist said in the short time he's been visiting Easton, he's come to appreciate both the architecture and atmosphere that is conducive to the arts community.

"I almost feel like I need to move to Easton now," Cole said.

Jim Toia, chair for the Bushkill
 Creek Corridor Council of
the Arts, talks about
"Grace Gate" at the
dedication on Tuesday.
 Cole, who is best known for his transformations of ordinary domestic objects, has been exhibited at a long list of major museums and other public venues across the country, including the Musuem of Modern Art in New York City. A New Jersey native, he lives in Minehill, NJ, near the Delaware Water Gap.

Jim Toia, chair for the Bushkill Creek Corridor Council of the Arts and an art teacher at Lafayette College, praised the work.

"The fact that you can step right through this gate, which sort of defies what a gate is about, is really great," he said. "When Willie came up with the idea for the gate, I looked at the drawing, and I thought, 'Wow, this is really minimal.' But after more talking, it became deeper and deeper. He was right, and what we have behind us is a testament to that."

Sculptor Willie Cole, right, chats with Karl Stirner.
 Toia also said more art is set to be added to the arts trail this summer, including a work by Easton artist Karl Stirner, for whom the nature path is named.

Mayor Sal Panto also praised the work and said he's excited to see the trail area populated with "good art" instead of graffiti.
Athena Barat, sings
"Amazing Grace".


"I don't know what good art is, but we know what bad art is," he said.

Adding an artistic note to the formality of the Grace Gate dedication, in a musical sense, the celebration was punctuated by two acapella  songs by Cole's friend Athena Barat, including the aptly chosen, "Amazing Grace."


Grace Gate, as seen from Easton Cemetery.


Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Discarded Bag Causes Bomb Scare on Northampton Street

By Christina Georgiou

Easton police and the Northampton County Bomb Squad  investigate a handbag
dropped on the sidewalk along Northampton Street at Seventh Street
that was suspected to contain a bomb. Roads in the immediate area were
closed for nearly two hours, before it was determined the package was not
dangerous.

A bag dropped from a car along Northampton Street at Seventh Street late this morning caused a bomb scare that led to roads in the immediate area being closed for nearly two hours, as officials investigated the parcel.

Easton Police Sgt. Robert Weber said a bystander flagged down a Northampton County sheriff's car shortly after 11:30 a.m. after finding an abandoned black bag on the sidewalk on the sidewalk near the armory building and suspecting it might be a bomb.

A review of city surveillance camera footage showed a white four-door Buick had pulled up near the side of the road at the stop light and a passenger dropping the bag, before the car pulled away, he said.

Police, who arrived on the scene at 11:35 a.m., immediately shut down the road from Sixth to Ninth streets along Northampton Street, and from Church to Ferry streets along Seventh Street.

"Obviously we couldn't approach the bag because it was suspicious," Weber said.

The Northampton County Bomb Squad was called to the scene to determine the contents of the parcel.

The black bag, an imitation leather handbag, turned out to have a box inside, with another box inside that, along with a few incidental items, Weber said.

Roads were reopened to traffic at approximately 1:25 p.m.

Residents in the immediate area were not evacuated, though only residents of the affected blocks were allowed access during the investigation, which lasted nearly two hours.

"I really couldn't speculate why they threw the bag out of the car," he said, adding that there was nothing of value in the bag.

Weber said police don't have the license plate number of the vehicle, and the other contents of the bag have turned up no real leads toward identifying its possible owner.

"Everything else in the bag is turning up dead ends. It's old information," Weber said. "It turned out to be nothing, thank goodness."

Monday, April 22, 2013

NJ Undercover Operation Results in Drug Charges for Easton Man

Jermaine Grant
Photo courtesy of the
Hunterdon County

Prosecutor's Office
An Easton man is one of 47 people charged with possession of heroin or intent to distribute the illegal drug, Hunterdon County New Jersey Prosecutor Anthony P. Kearns III announced today.

Jermaine Grant, 26, of Easton, faces unspecified charges as part of a 10-month long police operation that aimed to disrupt heroin trafficking in Hunterdon County, NJ, the prosecutor's office reported.

"Operation Day Tripper" targeted heroin traffickers and consumers who allegedly traveled regularly, some daily, to and from "source" cities, including Newark and Trenton, NJ, as well as Easton, for their illegal drugs, the prosecutor's office said.

A media release announcing the busts did not name the specific charges Grant faces.

Kearns also said that Hunterdon County is a gateway for drug distribution in New Jersey, due to Interstate 78 running through it, and the area has also seen a "dramatic spike" in gang activity.

“We aren’t going to sugarcoat this. This county has drug dealers, drug addicts, and street gangs, and they are affecting the quality of life here,” Kearns added in the release.

This Week in Easton, April 22 to 25

This week begins with a former President coming to the city, and the rest of the week has plenty to offer too...


Monday, April 22


Former President Jimmy Carter: 4 p.m.  Jimmy Carter, 39th President of the United States, talks about his work on behalf of human rights, democracy, and peace at the Carter Center, which he founded in 1982. Tickets required in the case of inclement weather, in which case the event will be moved indoors. Lafayette College, Oeschle Hall. Click here for more information.

Easton Area High School Jazz Ensemble: 6 p.m. Free. Rivals, 5 Lehn's Court (just off Centre Square). 610-392-2932 or www.rivalseaston.com

Wilson Area School District Excellence in Education Committee meeting: 6:15 p.m. William P. Tollinger Administration Building, 2040 Washington Blvd., Wilson Borough.

Wilson Borough Council meeting: 7 p.m. 2040 Hay Terrace, Wilson Borough.


Tuesday, April 23


Duplicate Bridge: 11:30 a.m. Temple Covenant of Peace, 1451 Northampton St.

Grace Gate Dedication: 2 p.m. A public celebration of the completion of Grace Gate by renowned scuptor Willie Cole. Parking available at the Lafayette College parking lot at the corner of North Third and Snyder streets, with shuttle service to the event site. Free. Dedication is at the Grace Gate, along the Karl Stirner Arts Trail. Click here for more information.

Easton City Council committee meeting: 6 p.m. City Hall, city council chambers, 6th floor, 1 South Third St.

Palmer Township Board of Supervisors meeting: 7 p.m. In the Palmer Library meeting room, at the Municipal Complex, 1 Weller Place (off of Newburg Road), Palmer Township.

Forks Township Planning Commission workshop meeting: 7 p.m. Forks Township Municipal Complex, 1606 Sullivan Trail, Forks Township.

Wednesday, April 24

Rovers Football Jerseys Sale: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Easton Area School District Athletic Department is selling game-used jerseys. $25 for one, or $40 for a home/away set. Cash only, no refunds. Easton Area High School, equipment room, 25th Street and William Penn Highway, Palmer Township. www.eastonfootball.org

Easton City Council meeting: 6 p.m. City Hall, city council chambers, 6th floor, 1 South Third St. College Hill Presbyterian Church, 501 Brodhead St.

Palmer Township Environmental Steering Committee meeting: A session will be held from 6:30 to 7 p.m. to answer questions related to the new waste and recycling system that will be implemented beginning on May 1. Regular meeting at 7 p.m. In the Palmer Library meeting room, at the Municipal Complex, 1 Weller Place (off of Newburg Road), Palmer Township.

Williams Township Zoning Hearing Board meeting: 7 p.m. Williams Township Municipal Complex, 655 Cider Press Road, Williams Township.

Brosky & Meyers: 7 p.m. The Widow's Tavern, 200 Main St., Stockertown. 610-365-8890 or www.widowstavern.com

Texas Hold'em: 7 & 9 p.m. Free. La Pazza, 1251 Ferry St. 610-515-0888 or www.lapazza.com

Traditional Irish open jam session: 7:30 p.m. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

Jam Session: 8 p.m. Rivals, 5 Lehn's Court (just off Centre Square). 610-392-2932 or www.rivalseaston.com


Thursday, April 25


Open Arms Senior Connection Open House: 9 to 10:30 a.m. Celebrating its third anniversary. Arndt's Lutheran Church, 1851 Arndt Road, Forks Township. 610-253-0726

Cops 'n Kids Reading Room open: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Children receive three free books for visiting. Easton Area Community Center, back entrance, 901 Washington St. 610-250-6562

Spring Lecture Series: 7 p.m. Donald Young presents "Steam Railroads of Great Britain". Sponsored by the National Canal Museum. Admission is $5 for members, $7 for non-members. Elaine and Peter Emrick Technology Center at Hugh Moore Park, 2750 Hugh Moore Park Road. 610-991-0503

"How Do We Guarantee Clean Water?": 7 to 8 p.m. The last of a four-part series on drinking water being held in Easton by the Jacobsburg Environmental Education Center. Free. Nurture Nature Center, 518 Northampton St. For more information or to register for a workshop, call 610-746-2809.

Yan Carlos Sanchez: 8 p.m. Porters' Pub, 700 Northampton St. 610-250-6561 or www.porterspubeaston.com

Bring (or wear) Your Own Vinyl night: 8 p.m. to midnight. With DJ Will. Black & Blue, 683 Walnut St. 610-438-3604 or www.blackandblueeaston.com

Karaoke: 8 p.m. Riegelsville Tavern, 1274 Easton Road, Riegelsville. 610-510-3030 or www.riegelsvilletavern.com

Last Small Town: 9 p.m. Two Rivers Brewing Company, 542 Northampton St. 610-829-1131 or www.tworiversbrewing.com

Hootchie Cootchie Men: 9:30 p.m. Pearly Bakers, 11 Centre Square. 610-253-9949 or www.pearlybakers.net

"This Week in Easton" lists what's happening during the weekdays, from special events to who's playing to government meetings, all in one handy place. Not just in the City of Easton, but for the entire greater Easton area...Published every Monday morning!

Is there a community or entertainment event you'd like to see here? Are you organizing something you'd like to have posted? Did we miss something? Email us!

Updated at 8:47 p.m. Correction made to reflect that this week's Easton City Council meeting is on College Hill, Wednesday, April 24, at 3:48 p.m.